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A “rigged” election? Chance (Spring 2004) presented data

Statistics for Business and Economics | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321826237 | Authors: James T. McClave, P. George Benson, Terry T Sincich ISBN: 9780321826237 51

Solution for problem 57SE Chapter 10

Statistics for Business and Economics | 12th Edition

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Statistics for Business and Economics | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321826237 | Authors: James T. McClave, P. George Benson, Terry T Sincich

Statistics for Business and Economics | 12th Edition

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Problem 57SE

A “rigged” election? Chance (Spring 2004) presented data from a recent election held to determine the board of directors of a local community. There were 27 candidates for the board, and each of 5,553 voters was allowed to choose 6 candidates. The claim was that “a fixed vote with fixed percentages [was] assigned to each and every candidate, making it impossible to participate in an honest election.” Votes were tallied in six time slots: after 600 total votes were in, after 1,200, after 2,444, after 3,444, after 4,444, and, finally, after 5,553 votes. The data on three of the candidates (Smith, Coppin, and Montes) are shown in the accompanying table and saved in the RIGVOTE file. A residential organization believes that “there was nothing random about the count and tallies for each time slot, and specific unnatural or rigged percentages were being assigned to each and every candidate.” Give your opinion. Is the probability of a candidate receiving votes independent of the time slot, and if so, does this imply a rigged election?

Based on Gelman, A. “55,000 residents desperately need your help!” Chance, Vol. 17, No. 2, Spring 2004.

Rejection region

A Large-Sample Test about (p1 - p2) — Comparing Fractions of Smokers for Two Years

Problem In the past decade, intensive antismoking campaigns have been sponsored by both federal and private agencies. Suppose the American Cancer Society randomly sampled 1,500 adults in 2000 and then sampled 1,750 adults in 2010 to determine whether there was evidence that the percentage of smokers had decreased. The results of the two sample surveys where x1 and x2 represent the numbers of smokers in the 2000 and 2010 samples, respectively. Do these data indicate that the fraction of smokers decreased over this 10-year period? Use α = .05.

Results of Smoking Survey

2000

2010

n1 = 1,500

n2 = 1,750

x1 = 555

x2 = 578

MINITAB contingency table analysis of data

Contingency Table for Marketing Example

Step-by-Step Solution:
Step 1 of 3

Tuesday, February 7, 2017 139A: Week 3 Day 1 Lecture Notes The Election of 1860 - Preceding information • Dred Scott decision - few supreme court decisions outweigh this - supreme court denied citizenship to african americans • denied that congress had the right to legislate on slavery in the territories • decision was a milestone to disunion • northern...

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Chapter 10, Problem 57SE is Solved
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Textbook: Statistics for Business and Economics
Edition: 12
Author: James T. McClave, P. George Benson, Terry T Sincich
ISBN: 9780321826237

This full solution covers the following key subjects: were, data, votes, smokers, Election. This expansive textbook survival guide covers 15 chapters, and 1630 solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Statistics for Business and Economics , edition: 12. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 57SE from chapter: 10 was answered by , our top Business solution expert on 07/21/17, 05:42AM. Statistics for Business and Economics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321826237. Since the solution to 57SE from 10 chapter was answered, more than 329 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. The answer to “A “rigged” election? Chance (Spring 2004) presented data from a recent election held to determine the board of directors of a local community. There were 27 candidates for the board, and each of 5,553 voters was allowed to choose 6 candidates. The claim was that “a fixed vote with fixed percentages [was] assigned to each and every candidate, making it impossible to participate in an honest election.” Votes were tallied in six time slots: after 600 total votes were in, after 1,200, after 2,444, after 3,444, after 4,444, and, finally, after 5,553 votes. The data on three of the candidates (Smith, Coppin, and Montes) are shown in the accompanying table and saved in the RIGVOTE file. A residential organization believes that “there was nothing random about the count and tallies for each time slot, and specific unnatural or rigged percentages were being assigned to each and every candidate.” Give your opinion. Is the probability of a candidate receiving votes independent of the time slot, and if so, does this imply a rigged election? Based on Gelman, A. “55,000 residents desperately need your help!” Chance, Vol. 17, No. 2, Spring 2004. Rejection regionA Large-Sample Test about (p1 - p2) — Comparing Fractions of Smokers for Two Years the past decade, intensive antismoking campaigns have been sponsored by both federal and private agencies. Suppose the American Cancer Society randomly sampled 1,500 adults in 2000 and then sampled 1,750 adults in 2010 to determine whether there was evidence that the percentage of smokers had decreased. The results of the two sample surveys where x1 and x2 represent the numbers of smokers in the 2000 and 2010 samples, respectively. Do these data indicate that the fraction of smokers decreased over this 10-year period? Use ? = .05.Results of Smoking Survey20002010n1 = 1,500n2 = 1,750x1 = 555x2 = 578 MINITAB contingency table analysis of dataContingency Table for Marketing Example” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 314 words.

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