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Solved: Natural rubber consists of long chains of carbon

Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780547586632 | Authors: Jerry L. Sarquis, Mickey Sarquis

Problem 6.1.102 Chapter 6

Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 | 1st Edition

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Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780547586632 | Authors: Jerry L. Sarquis, Mickey Sarquis

Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 | 1st Edition

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Problem 6.1.102

Natural rubber consists of long chains of carbon and hydrogen atoms covalently bonded together. When Charles Goodyear accidentally dropped a mixture of sulfur and rubber on a hot stove, the energy from the stove joined these chains together to make vulcanized rubber (named for Vulcan, the Roman god of fire). The carbon-hydrogen chains in vulcanized rubber are held together by two sulfur atoms that form covalent bonds between the chains. These covalent bonds are commonly called disulfide bridges. Explore other molecules that have such disulfide bridges. Present your findings to the class. 7

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Kyle LaPage CHEM 1046-Allison Moore (12129) 2/9/2016 Post Lab-Exp. 2 1. The law of conservation of energy says that energy cannot be created, nor destroyed. It can only change by transforming or transferring. This is extremely applicable to this experiment and solar panels in general. A solar panel takes the solar energy and transforms it into electrical energy. The energy that was absorbed...

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Chapter 6, Problem 6.1.102 is Solved
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Textbook: Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012
Edition: 1
Author: Jerry L. Sarquis, Mickey Sarquis
ISBN: 9780547586632

Since the solution to 6.1.102 from 6 chapter was answered, more than 273 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 was written by Patricia and is associated to the ISBN: 9780547586632. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012, edition: 1. This full solution covers the following key subjects: . This expansive textbook survival guide covers 98 chapters, and 1789 solutions. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 6.1.102 from chapter: 6 was answered by Patricia, our top Chemistry solution expert on 01/04/18, 01:13PM. The answer to “Natural rubber consists of long chains of carbon and hydrogen atoms covalently bonded together. When Charles Goodyear accidentally dropped a mixture of sulfur and rubber on a hot stove, the energy from the stove joined these chains together to make vulcanized rubber (named for Vulcan, the Roman god of fire). The carbon-hydrogen chains in vulcanized rubber are held together by two sulfur atoms that form covalent bonds between the chains. These covalent bonds are commonly called disulfide bridges. Explore other molecules that have such disulfide bridges. Present your findings to the class. 7” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 93 words.

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