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Solved: Suppose that a car starts from rest, its engine

Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems: Computing and Modeling | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780321796981 | Authors: C. Henry Edwards, David E. Penney, David T. Calvis ISBN: 9780321796981 216

Solution for problem 7 Chapter 2.3

Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems: Computing and Modeling | 5th Edition

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Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems: Computing and Modeling | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780321796981 | Authors: C. Henry Edwards, David E. Penney, David T. Calvis

Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems: Computing and Modeling | 5th Edition

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Problem 7

Suppose that a car starts from rest, its engine providing an acceleration of 10 ft=s2, while air resistance provides 0:1 ft=s2 of deceleration for each foot per second of the cars velocity. (a) Find the cars maximum possible (limiting) velocity. (b) Find how long it takes the car to attain 90% of its limiting velocity, and how far it travels while doing so

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CHEM 1030 Week 14 Thermochemical Equations A. The following guidelines are useful when considering thermochemical equations 1. Always specific the physical states of reactants and products because they help determine the actual enthalpy changes (different states have different enthalpies) 2. When multiplying an equation by a factor (n), multiply the delta H blue by the same factor 3. Reversing an equation changes the sign but not the magnitude of delta H (multiply by -1) B. Worked example 10.3 1. Calculate the solar energy required to produce 75.0 g of C6H12O6. 2. Calculate the number of moles needed, then multiply it by the entire equation Calorimetry A. The measurement of heat changes B. Heat changes are measured i a device called a calorimeter C. The specific heat (s) of a substance is the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 g of the substance by 1*C. D. The heat capacity (C) is the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of an object by 1*C E. The “object” may be a given quantity of a particular substance F. Heat capacity of water = 4.184 J / (1g x *C) x 1000g = 4184 J/*C G. Specific heat capacity has units of J/(g • °C) H. Heat capacity has units of J/°C Specific Heat and Heat Capacity A. The heat associated with a temperature hcnage ay be calculated B. q = smΔT C. q = CΔT D. Calculate the amount of heat required o heat 1.01 kg of water from 0.05*C to 35.81*C. Constant-Pressure Calorimetry A. Concepts to consider for coffee-cup calorimetry: p = delta H B. In an exothermic reaction, the system loses heat C. Worked example 10.5 D. Constant volume calorimetry is carried out in a device known as a constant-volume bomb E. A constant-volume calorimeter is an isolated system. F. Bomb calorimeters are typically used to determine heats of combustion. G. q = −q cal rxn Hess’s Law A. Hess’s law states that the change in enthalpy for a stepwise process is the sum of the enthalpy changes for each of the steps B. When applying Hess’s Law: 1. Manipulate thermochemical equations in a manner that gives the overall desired equation 2. Remember the rules for manipulating thermochemical equations: a. Always specify the physical states of reactants and products because they help determine the actual enthalpy changes. b. When multiplying an equation by a factor (n), multiply the ΔH value by same factor. c. Reversing an equation changes the sign but not the magnitude of ΔH. 3. Add the ΔH for each step after proper manipulation. 4. Process is useful for calculating enthalpies that cannot be found directly. Standard Enthalpies of Formation A. The standard enthalpy of formation (ΔH° ) isfdefined as the heat change that results when 1 mole of a compound is formed from its constituent elements in their standard states B. The superscripted degree sign denotes standard conditions 1. 1 atm pressure for gases 2. 1 M concentration for solutions D. “f” stands for formation E. ΔH f° for an element in its most stable form is zero. F. ΔH f° for many substances are tabulated in Appendix 2 of the textbook G. The standard enthalpy of reaction (ΔH °rxn ) is defined as the enthalpy of a reaction carried out under standard conditions. H. ΔH °rxn = [cΔH f°(C) + dΔH f°(D) ] – [aΔH f°(A) + bΔH f°(B)] I. ΔH °rxn = ΣnΔH f°(products) – ΣmΔH f°(reactants) J. n and m are the stoichiometric coefficients for the reactants and products. Bond Enthalpy and the Stability of Covalent Molecules A. The bond enthalpy is the enthalpy change associated with breaking a bond in 1 mole of gaseous molecule B. H (g) → H(g) + H(g) // ΔH° = 436.4 kJ/mol 2 C. The enthalpy for a gas phase reaction is given by: ΔH° = ΣBE(reactants) – ΣBE(products) D. ΔH° = total energy input – total energy released E. Bond enthalpy change in an exothermic reaction F. Bond enthalpy change in an endothermic reaction Lattice Energy and the Stability of Ionic Compounds A. A Born-Haber cycle is a cycle that relates the lattice energy of an ionic compound to quantities that can be measured B. Na(s) + 1/2 Cl (g) → Na (g) + Cl (g) - 2 Comparison of Ionic and Covalent Compounds A. Ionic and covalent compounds differ in their general physical properties because of the differences in the nature of their bonds. B. Check out table 10.6

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Chapter 2.3, Problem 7 is Solved
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Textbook: Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems: Computing and Modeling
Edition: 5
Author: C. Henry Edwards, David E. Penney, David T. Calvis
ISBN: 9780321796981

The full step-by-step solution to problem: 7 from chapter: 2.3 was answered by , our top Math solution expert on 01/04/18, 09:22PM. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems: Computing and Modeling, edition: 5. Since the solution to 7 from 2.3 chapter was answered, more than 287 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. The answer to “Suppose that a car starts from rest, its engine providing an acceleration of 10 ft=s2, while air resistance provides 0:1 ft=s2 of deceleration for each foot per second of the cars velocity. (a) Find the cars maximum possible (limiting) velocity. (b) Find how long it takes the car to attain 90% of its limiting velocity, and how far it travels while doing so” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 63 words. This full solution covers the following key subjects: . This expansive textbook survival guide covers 58 chapters, and 2027 solutions. Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems: Computing and Modeling was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321796981.

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Solved: Suppose that a car starts from rest, its engine