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(Modeling) Distance between Two Points Refer to Example 3.

Trigonometry | 10th Edition | ISBN: 9780321671776 | Authors: Margaret L. Lial, John Hornsby, David I. Schneider, Callie Daniels ISBN: 9780321671776 231

Solution for problem 37 Chapter 2.5

Trigonometry | 10th Edition

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Trigonometry | 10th Edition | ISBN: 9780321671776 | Authors: Margaret L. Lial, John Hornsby, David I. Schneider, Callie Daniels

Trigonometry | 10th Edition

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Problem 37

(Modeling) Distance between Two Points Refer to Example 3. A variation of the subtense bar method that surveyors use to determine larger distances d between two points P and Q is shown in the figure. In this case the subtense bar with length b is placed between the points P and Q so that the bar is centered on and perpendicular to the line of sight connecting P and Q. The angles a and b are measured from points P and Q, respectively. (Source: Mueller, I. and K. Ramsayer, Introduction to Surveying, Frederick Ungar Publishing Co.) (a) Find a formula for d involving a , b , and b. (b) Use your formula to determine d if a = 37 48, b = 42 03, and b = 2.000 cm.

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American Federal Government Notes 3/22­3/24  Due Sun. April 3 11:59 pm—writing assignment (turn into LAB D2L’s dropbox) o Policy issue memo (handout from Tues 3/22) o Office hours/labs this week—memo topics discussed/approved o Pick a topic you’re passionate about o Pick a specific issue topic in order to gain leverage o Consult with lab instructor and Professor Krutz o Be sure to focus first on problem definition before moving into solutions o SO, POLICY PROBLEM FIRST, THEN FOCUS ON SOLUTIONS TO THE PROBLEM.  Public opinion basics o P.O. defined: what individuals think about things o Why is it important  Because the idea of democracy hinges on it! o How is it measured  By asking people what they think in a poll  Representative  Research methods o Predicting elections is tricky because we don’t know turnout  The rise of the “Tea Party” movement on the right and the “Occupy” movement on the left are examples of how American politics have become more ideological. o An “ideology” is a belief system about how government should operate  Public Opinion “bottom­line” question o Respondents asked by Gallup Org. regularly since the 1940s the following question:  What do you think is the most important problem facing this country today  Big debate on Public Opinion o Where do opinions come from o Do we have top down opinion formation  Ex: elites communicate to us what is important  Which elites o Alternative perspective: public opinion is original  Ex: elites react to what the public wants o Which direction does the casual arrow point  Top­down vs. bottom­up  What factors drive Public Opinion o Political culture o Ideology (one in the same as partisanship) o Partisanship (one in the same as ideology) o Your upbringing o Major events and crises—work as a compass  Ex: 9/11, school shootings, terrorism o Top­down (elite driven) vs bottom­up (originating with the public)  Is public opinion in the U.S. elite­driven (top­down) or does it originate with the public(bottom­up) **may be an essay question on the exam** o John Zaller and “on­the­fly” opinions  Zaller’s perspective—we can’t do a fully rational analysis of everything we see in our lives, our opinions are constantly changing  “Democracy is not a spectator sport”  Voter turnout  What factors explain turnout o Two levels  Why US turns out lower than other countries  Electoral college, some countries have compulsory voting (you must vote), population size, taking representative democracy for granted, logistics, frequency, apathy  Why some Americans turn out and others do not o The “paradox” of voter turnout  “paradox”­ can be seen in different ways  Relates to education  Expectation­ the more educated you are, the more likely you are to vote. The less educated you are, the less likely you are to vote.

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Chapter 2.5, Problem 37 is Solved
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Textbook: Trigonometry
Edition: 10
Author: Margaret L. Lial, John Hornsby, David I. Schneider, Callie Daniels
ISBN: 9780321671776

The answer to “(Modeling) Distance between Two Points Refer to Example 3. A variation of the subtense bar method that surveyors use to determine larger distances d between two points P and Q is shown in the figure. In this case the subtense bar with length b is placed between the points P and Q so that the bar is centered on and perpendicular to the line of sight connecting P and Q. The angles a and b are measured from points P and Q, respectively. (Source: Mueller, I. and K. Ramsayer, Introduction to Surveying, Frederick Ungar Publishing Co.) (a) Find a formula for d involving a , b , and b. (b) Use your formula to determine d if a = 37 48, b = 42 03, and b = 2.000 cm.” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 130 words. Since the solution to 37 from 2.5 chapter was answered, more than 819 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. This full solution covers the following key subjects: . This expansive textbook survival guide covers 59 chapters, and 3747 solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Trigonometry, edition: 10. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 37 from chapter: 2.5 was answered by , our top Math solution expert on 01/11/18, 01:35PM. Trigonometry was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321671776.

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