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An acticle in Biometrics [“Integrative Analysis of

Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers | 6th Edition | ISBN: 9781118539712 | Authors: Douglas C. Montgomery, George C. Runger ISBN: 9781118539712 55

Solution for problem 106E Chapter 4.7

Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers | 6th Edition

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Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers | 6th Edition | ISBN: 9781118539712 | Authors: Douglas C. Montgomery, George C. Runger

Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers | 6th Edition

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Problem 106E

An acticle in Biometrics [“Integrative Analysis of Transcriptomic and Proteomic Data of Desulfovibrio Vulgaris: A Nonlinear Model to Predict Abundance of Undetected Proteins” (2009)] reported that protein abundance from an operon (a set of biologically related genes) was less dispersed than from randomly selected genes. In the research, 1000 sets of genes were randomly constructed, and of these sets, 75% were more disperse than a specific opteron. If the probability that a random set is more disperse than this opteron is truly 0.5, approximate the probability that 750 or more random sets exceed the opteron. From this result, what do you conclude about the dispersion in the opteron versus random genes?

Step-by-Step Solution:

Step 1 of 2:

            Given that, n = 1000, p = 0.5

    Let X = binomial random variable representing number of sets that exceed the Opteron with n = 1000 and p = 0.5.

  Normal approximation is good for np > 5, and n(1-p) >5.

  Then,

             np = 1000(0.5) = 500 > 5 and

            n(1-p) = 1000(1-0.5) = 500 > 5.

       Z = standard normal random variable

              

 

 

Step 2 of 2

Chapter 4.7, Problem 106E is Solved
Textbook: Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers
Edition: 6
Author: Douglas C. Montgomery, George C. Runger
ISBN: 9781118539712

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers , edition: 6. Since the solution to 106E from 4.7 chapter was answered, more than 255 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. The answer to “An acticle in Biometrics [“Integrative Analysis of Transcriptomic and Proteomic Data of Desulfovibrio Vulgaris: A Nonlinear Model to Predict Abundance of Undetected Proteins” (2009)] reported that protein abundance from an operon (a set of biologically related genes) was less dispersed than from randomly selected genes. In the research, 1000 sets of genes were randomly constructed, and of these sets, 75% were more disperse than a specific opteron. If the probability that a random set is more disperse than this opteron is truly 0.5, approximate the probability that 750 or more random sets exceed the opteron. From this result, what do you conclude about the dispersion in the opteron versus random genes?” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 111 words. Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781118539712. This full solution covers the following key subjects: genes, opteron, Sets, random, Randomly. This expansive textbook survival guide covers 97 chapters, and 2005 solutions. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 106E from chapter: 4.7 was answered by , our top Statistics solution expert on 07/28/17, 07:57AM.

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