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Why does a bicyclist pick up speed on a downhill road even when he is not pedaling?

Thermodynamics: An Engineering Approach | 8th Edition | ISBN:  9780073398174 | Authors: Yunus A. Cengel, Michael A. Boles ISBN: 9780073398174 56

Solution for problem 2P Chapter 1

Thermodynamics: An Engineering Approach | 8th Edition

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Thermodynamics: An Engineering Approach | 8th Edition | ISBN:  9780073398174 | Authors: Yunus A. Cengel, Michael A. Boles

Thermodynamics: An Engineering Approach | 8th Edition

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Problem 2P

Why does a bicyclist pick up speed on a downhill road even when he is not pedaling? Does this violate the conservation of energy principle?

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Melodi Harfouche Chemistry 130 Dr. Yihui Yang 02/09/2017 Integrated Rate Law: Dependence of Concentration on Time  The integrated rate law essentially links concentrations of reactants or products w/time directly  For the reaction A  products, the rate is =k[A]^n  Applying calculus to integrate the rate law (which is the initial rate of a reaction) gives another equation which shows the relationship between the concentration of reactant A and the time of the reaction o That equation that comes out of that is the integrated rate law First­Order Reactions  For first­order reactions, the rate law is =k[A]^1, which is essentially just =k[A]  For the integrated rate law of a first­order reaction it is o where [A] sub 0 is the initial concentration of ln [A] = − kt + A o where [A] sub t is the concentration of A at time (t) t o another way to think of this equation is [A]  A graph of a first­order reaction: ln = o Where the ln[A]sub t is the same as y t −kt o Where –kt is the same as mx o Where the ln[A]sub 0 is the same as b [A] o To equal the commonly known equation: y=mx+b 0  The ln[A] vs. time results in a straight line o Where the slope = ­k o Where the y­intercept = ln[A]sub 0  The integrated raw law depends on order (first­order, second, etc.)  From the slope of the graph you can

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Chapter 1, Problem 2P is Solved
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Textbook: Thermodynamics: An Engineering Approach
Edition: 8
Author: Yunus A. Cengel, Michael A. Boles
ISBN: 9780073398174

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