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A wet cooling tower is to cool 25 kg/s of cooling water

Thermodynamics: An Engineering Approach | 8th Edition | ISBN:  9780073398174 | Authors: Yunus A. Cengel, Michael A. Boles ISBN: 9780073398174 56

Solution for problem 110P Chapter 14

Thermodynamics: An Engineering Approach | 8th Edition

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Thermodynamics: An Engineering Approach | 8th Edition | ISBN:  9780073398174 | Authors: Yunus A. Cengel, Michael A. Boles

Thermodynamics: An Engineering Approach | 8th Edition

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Problem 110P

Problem 110P

A wet cooling tower is to cool 25 kg/s of cooling water from 40 to 30°C at a location where the atmospheric pressure is 96 kPa. Atmospheric air enters the tower at 20°C and 70 percent relative humidity and leaves saturated at 35°C. Neglecting the power input to the fan, determine (a) the volume flow rate of air into the cooling tower and (b) the mass flow rate of the required makeup water.

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Exam 2 Study Guide Tuesday, March 29, 2012:37 PM Australia Longest unbroken artistic tradition • 50,000 years Legend:The earth was featureless until the primordial beings used their bodies to create the landscape, so much of the landscape in Australia is directly associated with spirits Life stages involve movement Australia and the Western World • 1788: British declare Australia as terra nullius, the empty land. At this time Australian indigenous people were around 1 million in population • In the beginning of the twentieth century the newly formed Federal government introduces policies of assimilation. The gov would round up all the women who were half native and take them into European society in hopes of exterminating indigenous people • 1963: North East Arnhem Land people submit art as a means of expressing to the world the nature of their attachment to the land, bark paintings as legal title to their land. Australian Government responds by issuing land rights in 1976 Utilitarian Objects Corroboree Churinga • (most) Sacred wood or stone boards • Used for ceremonies, serve as books • Used in ground paintings, earth mounds • Used as bull roarer ○ Communication • They're sacred because it's said they're the property of the primordial beings • Notion of a bird's eye view of a landscape • Symbolism varies upon level of initiation • Initiated males are pretty much the only ones allowed to see them Rock paintings ○ Communication • They're sacred because it's said they're the property of the primordial beings • Notion of a bird's eye view of a landscape • Symbolism varies upon level of initiation • Initiated males are pretty much the only ones allowed to see them Rock paintings • Gwion Gwion / Giro Giro • Permanent art • Process art-­‐repainted ritually • Pigments ○ White clay, black charcoal or magnesium, red and yellow ocher • Brushes ○ Natural fibers, fingers, mouth (air brush) • Wandjina, Kimberely Area ○ They are the primordial beings ○ Control things like weather, fertility, etc. • Rock engravings ○ Astronomy ○ Initiation ceremonies ○ Pathways between settings, walkabout ○ Baiame § Sky father of the dreaming § You can tell it's him in an engraving because he has a huge penis § Women can't know anything about him or see pictures of him § No one is allowed to say his name Bark Painting: Ephemeral art • Process: oral and visual brought together • Eucalyptus bark canvas • Colors: red, yellow, black, white • Brushes: Chewed bark, palm leaf fibers, small feather • Fixatives: tree sap, wild bee wax and honey, sea turtle egg yolks • Cross-­‐hatch design: identify claims • Repainting it reinvigorates it Arnhem Land (Groote Eylandt) • Black background, 1940s Corroboree • Initiation dances/ceremony Utilitarian Objects and Arts of Adornment • Often geometric • Patterns may be symbolic/sacred • Mark activities of ancestral beings who shaped the landscape during "the Dreaming" • Boomerang ○ Returning boomerangs are only used for entertainment • Often geometric • Patterns may be symbolic/sacred • Mark activities of ancestral beings who shaped the landscape during "the Dreaming" • Boomerang ○ Returning boomerangs are only used for entertainment ○ The vast majority doesn't return, they have specific funtions ○ Hunting boomerangs § You can throw them animals to kill things § In times of war you could throw them at people ○ Fighting boomerangs § Like 4 ft tall, you use them like a club Ceremonial Boomerangs ○ § You can use them to make specific sounds ○ Embellishments (different between areas) § Queensland □ circular/sem-­icircular shapes ® Linked with water ® Represents rippling of water, or the marks on sand where water has receded over time □ Lasange shapes (elongated diamond shapes) ® Symbol for fishing nets § Northern Territory § Arid Desert □ #7 boomerang • Shields ○ Buttress roots ○ Focus on geometric form ○ Parrying shields § Much thinner § Used for diverting arrows ○ Not considered complete until painted ○ Central feature that the pattern almost revolves around • Belt Ornament of PendaRiji) ( ○ Made from human hair and oyster shells ○ Created on the east coast where you can find the specific oyster ○ In western Australia (Kimberely Region) the patterns are related to water but the trade network in AU gave it different contexts as it changes culture Torres Strait Islander Peoples • Technically part of Queensland • More closely related to the cultures in New Guinea • Masks culture Torres Strait Islander Peoples • Technically part of Queensland • More closely related to the cultures in New Guinea • Masks ○ Turtleshell, wood, fiber, feathers, and shell First recorded in 1506 ○ ○ Depicting primordial beings § Dances at ceremonies gives the primordial beings bodies ○ Rigid geometric nose, (thin pointy long sharp) Melanesia Longest unbroken artistic tradition • 50,000 years Legend:The earth was featureless until the primordial beings used their bodies to create the landscape, so much of the landscape in Australia is directly associated with spirits Life stages involve movement Australia and the Western World • 1788: British declare Australia as terra nullius, the empty land. At this time Australian indigenous people were around 1 million in population • In the beginning of the twentieth century the newly formed Federal government introduces policies of assimilation. The gov would round up all the women who were half native and take them into European society in hopes of exterminating indigenous people • 1963: North East Arnhem Land people submit art as a means of expressing to the world the nature of their attachment to the land, bark paintings as legal title to their land. Australian Government responds by issuing land rights in 1976 Utilitarian Objects Corroboree Churinga • (most) Sacred wood or stone boards • Used for ceremonies, serve as books • Used in ground paintings, earth mounds • Used as bull roarer ○ Communication • They're sacred because it's said they're the property of the primordial beings • Notion of a bird's eye view of a landscape • Used for ceremonies, serve as books • Used in ground paintings, earth mounds • Used as bull roarer ○ Communication • They're sacred because it's said they're the property of the primordial beings • Notion of a bird's eye view of a landscape • Symbolism varies upon level of initiation • Initiated males are pretty much the only ones allowed to see them Rock paintings • Gwion Gwion / Giro Giro • Permanent art • Process art-­‐repainted ritually • Pigments ○ White clay, black charcoal or magnesium, red and yellow ocher • Brushes ○ Natural fibers, fingers, mouth (air brush) • Wandjina, Kimberely Area ○ They are the primordial beings ○ Control things like weather, fertility, etc. • Rock engravings ○ Astronomy ○ Initiation ceremonies ○ Pathways between settings, walkabout ○ Baiame § Sky father of the dreaming § You can tell it's him in an engraving because he has a huge penis § Women can't know anything about him or see pictures of him § No one is allowed to say his name Bark Painting: Ephemeral art • Process: oral and visual brought together • Eucalyptus bark canvas • Colors: red, yellow, black, white • Brushes: Chewed bark, palm leaf fibers, small feather • Fixatives: tree sap, wild bee wax and honey, sea turtle egg yolks • Cross-­‐hatch design: identify claims • Repainting it reinvigorates it Arnhem Land (Groote Eylandt) • Black background, 1940s Corroboree • Initiation dances/ceremony Utilitarian Objects and Arts of Adornment • Often geometric • Patterns may be symbolic/sacred • Mark activities of ancestral beings who shaped the landscape during "the Corroboree • Initiation dances/ceremony Utilitarian Objects and Arts of Adornment • Often geometric • Patterns may be symbolic/sacred • Mark activities of ancestral beings who shaped the landscape during "the Dreaming" • Boomerang ○ Returning boomerangs are only used for entertainment ○ The vast majority doesn't return, they have specific funtions ○ Hunting boomerangs § You can throw them animals to kill things § In times of war you could throw them at people ○ Fighting boomerangs § Like 4 ft tall, you use them like a club Ceremonial Boomerangs ○ § You can use them to make specific sounds ○ Embellishments (different between areas) § Queensland □ circular/sem-­icircular shapes ® Linked with water ® Represents rippling of water, or the marks on sand where water has receded over time □ Lasange shapes (elongated diamond shapes) ® Symbol for fishing nets § Northern Territory § Arid Desert □ #7 boomerang • Shields ○ Buttress roots ○ Focus on geometric form ○ Parrying shields § Much thinner § Used for diverting arrows ○ Not considered complete until painted ○ Central feature that the pattern almost revolves around • Belt Ornament of PendaRiji) ( ○ Made from human hair and oyster shells ○ Created on the east coast where you can find the specific oyster ○ In western Australia (Kimberely Region) the patterns are related to water but the trade network in AU gave it different contexts as it changes culture Torres Strait Islander Peoples ○ Created on the east coast where you can find the specific oyster ○ In western Australia (Kimberely Region) the patterns are related to water but the trade network in AU gave it different contexts as it changes culture Torres Strait Islander Peoples • Technically part of Queensland • More closely related to the cultures in New Guinea • Masks ○ Turtleshell, wood, fiber, feathers, and shell First recorded in 1506 ○ ○ Depicting primordial beings § Dances at ceremonies gives the primordial beings bodies ○ Rigid geometric nose, (thin pointy long sharp)

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Chapter 14, Problem 110P is Solved
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Textbook: Thermodynamics: An Engineering Approach
Edition: 8
Author: Yunus A. Cengel, Michael A. Boles
ISBN: 9780073398174

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A wet cooling tower is to cool 25 kg/s of cooling water