×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Anatomy & Physiology - 1 Edition - Chapter 14 - Problem 1
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Anatomy & Physiology - 1 Edition - Chapter 14 - Problem 1

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

Watch this video (http://openstaxcollege.org/l/ DanielleReed) to learn about Dr

Anatomy & Physiology | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9781938168130 | Authors: Kelly A. Young, James A. Wise, Peter DeSaix, Dean H. Kruse, & 6 more ISBN: 9781938168130 330

Solution for problem 1 Chapter 14

Anatomy & Physiology | 1st Edition

  • Textbook Solutions
  • 2901 Step-by-step solutions solved by professors and subject experts
  • Get 24/7 help from StudySoup virtual teaching assistants
Anatomy & Physiology | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9781938168130 | Authors: Kelly A. Young, James A. Wise, Peter DeSaix, Dean H. Kruse, & 6 more

Anatomy & Physiology | 1st Edition

4 5 1 380 Reviews
15
0
Problem 1

Watch this video (http://openstaxcollege.org/l/ DanielleReed) to learn about Dr. Danielle Reed of the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia, PA, who became interested in science at an early age because of her sensory experiences. She recognized that her sense of taste was unique compared with other people she knew. Now, she studies the genetic differences between people and their sensitivities to taste stimuli. In the video, there is a brief image of a person sticking out their tongue, which has been covered with a colored dye. This is how Dr. Reed is able to visualize and count papillae on the surface of the tongue. People fall into two large groups known as tasters and non-tasters on the basis of the density of papillae on their tongue, which also indicates the number of taste buds. Non-tasters can taste food, but they are not as sensitive to certain tastes, such as bitterness. Dr. Reed discovered that she is a non-taster, which explains why she perceived bitterness differently than other people she knew. Are you very sensitive to tastes? Can you see any similarities among the members of your family?

Step-by-Step Solution:
Step 1 of 3

Evolutionary Bio Test 3 Week 1 This set of notes includes everything Dr. Sears covered in class plus all of the vocabulary and major notes from the textbook from this week. 3/3 ­Post­test talk Textbook Vocab Ch. 9 Quantitative genetics­ branch of evolutionary biology that provides tools for analyzing the evolution of multilocus traits Qualitative traits­ traits that allows characters to be qualified by looking at them Quantitative traits­ characters with continuously distributed phenotypes Quantitative trait loci (QTLs)­ portions of the genome that influence quantitative traits QTL mapping­ the collective name for a suite of related techniques that employ marker loci to scan chromosomes and identify regions containing genes that contribute to a contribute to a quantitative trait Heritability­ the fraction of the total variation in a trait that is due to variation in genes Phenotype variation (V )­Ptotal variation in a trait Genetic variation (V )G variation among individuals due to variation in their genes Environmental variation (V )­Eariation among individuals due to variation in their environments Heritability equation (Broad­Sense heritability)­ V /V =(V /V +V ) G P G G E Midparent value­ the average of the parents Midoffspring­ average of the offspring (if more than 1) Narrow­sense heritability­ the ratio of additive genetic variance to the total phenotypic variance Directional selection­ when fitness consist

Step 2 of 3

Chapter 14, Problem 1 is Solved
Step 3 of 3

Textbook: Anatomy & Physiology
Edition: 1
Author: Kelly A. Young, James A. Wise, Peter DeSaix, Dean H. Kruse, & 6 more
ISBN: 9781938168130

The answer to “Watch this video (http://openstaxcollege.org/l/ DanielleReed) to learn about Dr. Danielle Reed of the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia, PA, who became interested in science at an early age because of her sensory experiences. She recognized that her sense of taste was unique compared with other people she knew. Now, she studies the genetic differences between people and their sensitivities to taste stimuli. In the video, there is a brief image of a person sticking out their tongue, which has been covered with a colored dye. This is how Dr. Reed is able to visualize and count papillae on the surface of the tongue. People fall into two large groups known as tasters and non-tasters on the basis of the density of papillae on their tongue, which also indicates the number of taste buds. Non-tasters can taste food, but they are not as sensitive to certain tastes, such as bitterness. Dr. Reed discovered that she is a non-taster, which explains why she perceived bitterness differently than other people she knew. Are you very sensitive to tastes? Can you see any similarities among the members of your family?” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 187 words. This full solution covers the following key subjects: . This expansive textbook survival guide covers 28 chapters, and 1228 solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Anatomy & Physiology, edition: 1. Since the solution to 1 from 14 chapter was answered, more than 266 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. Anatomy & Physiology was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781938168130. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 1 from chapter: 14 was answered by , our top Science solution expert on 03/05/18, 08:25PM.

Other solutions

Discover and learn what students are asking





Calculus: Early Transcendental Functions : Conservative Vector Fields and Independence of Path
?In Exercises 1 - 4, show that the value of \(\int_{C} F \cdot d r\) is the same for each parametric representation of C. \(\mathbf{F}(x, y)=y








People also purchased

Related chapters

Unlock Textbook Solution

Enter your email below to unlock your verified solution to:

Watch this video (http://openstaxcollege.org/l/ DanielleReed) to learn about Dr