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A 35.0-mL sample of 1.00 M KBr and a 60.0-mL sample of

Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321696724 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward ISBN: 9780321696724 27

Solution for problem 99AE Chapter 4

Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition

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Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321696724 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward

Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition

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Problem 99AE

Problem 99AE

A 35.0-mL sample of 1.00 M KBr and a 60.0-mL sample of 0.600 M KBr are mixed. The solution is then heated to evaporate water until the total volume is 50.0 mL. What is the molarity of the KBr in the final solution?

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Cold or wet weather makes you sick It is interesting that this chapter is titled “Cold or wet weather makes you sick” when the chapter discusses nothing about links between wet weather and getting sick, it simply focuses on cold weather. Also, it appears that the authors of the book took this myth very literally because the implication in this chapter is that people believe that the cold actually causes colds, which some people may still believe; however, this is hardly the myth in the twenty­first century because the prospect of cold weather directly causing illness is ridiculous. Other noteworthy observations of this chapter are that it is a measly three paragraphs long, offering hardly any evidence for either side of the argument and only vaguely cites two studies, neither providing any quantifiable evidence for the points which they are arguing. Most people living in the twenty­first century agree that there is no direct relationship between cold weather and catching colds. However, there are multiple valid arguments for how cold weather might indirectly cause colds by triggering responses in the body which can weaken the body’s defenses against the rhinovirus. The main two theories of the ways that the body’s defense systems can be weakened by cold weather are a weakening of the body’s immune system by hypothermia, and vasoconstriction (primarily in the nose). When it is cold outside, the body has to work harder to maintain a healthy internal temperature. Putting in this extra work, some attention is taken away from the body’s immune syste

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Chapter 4, Problem 99AE is Solved
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Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 12
Author: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward
ISBN: 9780321696724

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A 35.0-mL sample of 1.00 M KBr and a 60.0-mL sample of