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Concentrations of Solutions (Section)(a) Starting with

Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321696724 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward ISBN: 9780321696724 27

Solution for problem 75E Chapter 4

Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition

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Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321696724 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward

Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition

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Problem 75E

Concentrations of Solutions (Section)

(a) Starting with solid sucrose, C12H22O11, describe how you would prepare 250 mL of a 0.250 M sucrose solution. (b) Describe how you would prepare 350.0 mL of 0.100 MC12H22O11 starting with 3.00 L of 1.50 M C12H22O11.

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AEDE3680Midterm1StudyGuide RegionalEconomics&SustainableGrowth ManyofthesenotesarederivedfromDr.Faggian’sPowerPointslidespostedon Carmen.Ifindthatherslidescontainmuchusefulmaterialthathasaidedinmyunderstanding ofclassconcepts. Lectures1-5areincludedinthisstudymaterial! LECTURE1 Whatisregionaleconomics • Generalregionaleconomicscanbedefinedasthe“subjectconcernedwith understandingandexplainingthegeographicconfigurationoftheeconomy,particularly regardingindustriallocation,regionaldevelopment,urbanization,migration,landuse, etc.”(TheCanadianEncyclopedia,2010) • HooverandGiarrantani(Chapter1)statethatregionaleconomicscanbeseenasthe subjectwhichtriestoanswerthisquestion:”Whatiswhere,andwhy—andsowhat” o What:everytypeofeconomicactivity.Theroleofspaceisfundamental. o Where:locations;involvesproximity,concentration,dispersion,similarityor disparityofspatialpatterns. o Whyandsowhat:economicinterpretationsandpolicyimplications. • Whydifferentpartsofthesameeconomy(regions)behavedifferently. Whatisa“region” • Manydifferentdefinitions • TheUnitedStatescanbedividedintodifferentregions: o Counties o States o Timezones • InEurope,therearethreedifferentlevels: o NUTS1—majorsocioeconomicregions(97current) o NUTS2—basicregionsfortheapplicationofregionalpolicies(271current) o NUTS3—smallregionsforspecificdiagnoses(1,303current) • HOWEVER,thepopulationthresholdsareverydifferentfortheU.S.versusEurope. There’smorevariationwithintheUnitedStates.E.g… o NUTS1minimumis3millionandmaximumis7million o NUTS2minimumis800kandmaximumis3million o NUTS3minimumis150kandmaximumis800k o Therearesomeexceptions LECTURE2 IndustrialLocationAnalysis:TheWeberModel • BasicmodelsproposedbyWeberandMosesarebasedontransportationcosts 1 • TheWebermodel(1909)representsthe“fundamentalbuildingblocksof microeconomicfirmlocationanalysis”(McCann,page3).It’sbasedonafewsimplifying assumptions… o 1.Thefirmisdefinedasapointinspace(therecanbenomultiplelocations); o 2.Theaimofthefirmissimplytomaximizeprofit; o 3.Thefirmproducesoneproductusingonlytwoproductionfactors; o 4.Thereisafixedproductionfactorrelationship,e.g.thereisonlyone“recipe” tocombinethetwofactorstogetthefinalproduct. • TheWeberModelterminology o Inputs—productionfactorswhichafirmusestoproduceagood o Output—finalproductproduced • Thelocationproblemcanbegraphicallyrepresentedbywhathasbecomeknownasthe Webertriangle. o Theequilibriumpointisthefinallocation. o Isodapanescanbeusedtoincorporatecostsoflabororland § Movingiscostly,soafirmrelocationsONLYwhenthefollowingcondition holds:laborcostsavings>extratransportationcosts+relocationcosts § Thegovernmentoffersincentivesforrelocationinmoreperipheralareas tohelpdepressedregions…theindustryrelocatesifthisconditionholds: laborcostsavings+governmentalincentives>extratransportation costs+relocationcosts ClassificationofFirms 1. Resource-oriented—firmswhoselocationdecisionsaredictatedbythelocationof naturalresources.Inasense,theirlocationdecisionsaretheeasiestbecausetheyhave fewchoicesregardingwheretheycanlocate…e.g.coalmineshavetobelocatednear coaldeposits.GoogleInternationalFallsinMinnesota.It’sthe“IceboxoftheNation” becausebusinessesthatneedtotestitemstobeusedincoldweatherlocatethere. 2. Transport-oriented a. Input-oriented—engagedinweight-losingactivities,e.g.wheretheoutputis lighterthanitsinputsandhencelessexpensivetoship…inputsaremorefragile orspoilquickly.E.g.canningfirmstendtolocateneartheinputsource.Fish spoilsquicklybeforebeingcanned. b. Market-oriented—thefirmminimizestotaltransportationcostsbylocatingat themarket.Thesefirmsarenormallyengagedinweight-gainingactivities,e.g. wheretheoutputisheavier,bulkier,moredelicate,perishableormore dangerousthanitsinputsandhencemoreexpensivetoship. 3. Footloose—firmsthatarenottiedtoanyparticularlocation,andforwhich transportationcostsarenotveryimportant.Therefore,theyareneitherresource-nor transport-oriented.Mostservicesarefootloose,buttheystilltendtolocateincentral areaswheretheycanexploitagglomerationeconomies(tobementionedlater). LECTURE3 TheMosesModel(1958) 2 • Takesintoaccountthatinputscanbesubstitutable,whichisimportantbecausein realityfirmshavemorethanoneinput“combination”toproduceanoutput o Inproducingacar,afirmcanuse150kgofsteeland50kgofplastic,or100kgof both,or50kgofsteeland150kgofplastic • OppositeoftheWeberModel.Withoutinputsubstitutability,thefirmwouldhave movedclosertothemoreexpensiveinputtosaveonthehighesttransportationcosts. • TheMosesModelconsidersbothinputcombinationanddistances. o Mosesisabetterapproximation,butWeberisabetterrepresentation PalanderandHotellingModels • Assumesthatmarketsareareas,insteadofapointinspace(y)likeintheMosesand Webermodels. • PalanderModel o TwofirmsAandBarelocatedinareasAandBrespectively.Aone-dimensional marketareaisdefinedbythelineOL. o Differenttransportationcostsarerepresentedbybranchesofthe“tree.” Steeperbranchesmeanhighertransportationcosts. • HotellingModel o Spacegivesyouanadvantage(spatialmonopoly)providesanincentiveforfirms touselocationasa“competitiveweapon”toacquiregreatermonopoly....

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Chapter 4, Problem 75E is Solved
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Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 12
Author: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward
ISBN: 9780321696724

Since the solution to 75E from 4 chapter was answered, more than 336 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 75E from chapter: 4 was answered by , our top Chemistry solution expert on 04/03/17, 07:58AM. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science, edition: 12. This full solution covers the following key subjects: sucrose, describe, PREPARE, starting, solid. This expansive textbook survival guide covers 49 chapters, and 5471 solutions. The answer to “Concentrations of Solutions (Section)(a) Starting with solid sucrose, C12H22O11, describe how you would prepare 250 mL of a 0.250 M sucrose solution. (b) Describe how you would prepare 350.0 mL of 0.100 MC12H22O11 starting with 3.00 L of 1.50 M C12H22O11.” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 41 words. Chemistry: The Central Science was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321696724.

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Concentrations of Solutions (Section)(a) Starting with