×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Chemistry: The Central Science - 12 Edition - Chapter 9 - Problem 15e
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Chemistry: The Central Science - 12 Edition - Chapter 9 - Problem 15e

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

(a)What is meant by the term electron domain? (b) Explain

Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321696724 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward ISBN: 9780321696724 27

Solution for problem 15E Chapter 9

Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition

  • Textbook Solutions
  • 2901 Step-by-step solutions solved by professors and subject experts
  • Get 24/7 help from StudySoup virtual teaching assistants
Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321696724 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward

Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition

4 5 1 305 Reviews
12
5
Problem 15E

(a)What is meant by the term electron domain? (b) Explain in what way electron domains behave like the balloons in Figure 9.5.Why do they do so?

Reference

Step-by-Step Solution:
Step 1 of 3

1 Define an operating system An operating system is a program/software that acts as an interface between the user and the computer hardware and controls the execution of all kinds of programs. 2 Computer types Micro, mini, mainframe, super 3 Describe the evolution and trends of the operating system 1940: First generation Computer based on vacuum tube technology 1950: Second generation Focused on cost effectiveness 1960: Third generation Multiprogramming, program scheduling 1970 Virtual memory developed to solve physical limitation 1980 Multiprocessing 1990 Demand for internet capability, and multimedia applications 2000 virtualization 4 Distinguish an operating system from a computer system Computer system is software (program). Hardware (physical machine and electric components. Operating System is part of computer system (software) and manages all hardware and software 5 Computer object oriented design  Load only the critical elements into the main memory and call other objects as needed.  Kernel (operating system nucleus) o Resides in memory at all times, performs essential tasks, and protected by hardware  Kernel reorganization o Memory resident: process scheduling and memory allocation o Modules: all other functions  Advantages o Modification and customization without disrupting integrity of the remainder of the system o Software development more productive 6 Explain the operations of an operating system Monitor its resources continuously. Enforce the policies that determine who gets what, when and how much. Allocate the resource when appropriate De­allocate the resource when appropriate 7 List the different categories of operating systems Five types/categories: Batch, Interactive, Real­time, Hybrid, Embedded Two distinguishing features = Response time and How data enters into the system 8 Identify the key operating system managers  Memory Manager: the section of the operating system responsible for controlling the use of memory. It checks the validity of each request for memory space and, if it’s a legal request, allocates the amount needed to execute the job. Ram  Processor Manager: a composite of two sub­managers, the Job Scheduler and the Process Scheduler, which decides how to allocate the CPU. CPU  Device Manager: the section of the operating system responsible for controlling the use of devices. It monitors every device, channel, and control unit and chooses the most efficient way to allocate all of the system’s devices. Keyboard, printer, disk drive  File Manager: the section of the operating system responsible for controlling the use of files. Program files, data files, compilers.  Network Manager: the section of the operating system responsible for controlling access to and the use of networked resources. Network Comms, protocols 9 Describe the early memory management allocation schemes  Single­user contiguous,  Fixed partitions,  Dynamic partitions Common requirements of old memory management techniques (Disadvantages of the old schemes)  Entire program loaded into memory  Contiguous storage  Stays in memory until job completed  Each places severe restrictions on job size  Sufficient for first three generations of computers  Multiprogramming not supported in Single­user contiguous 10 Describe the new memory management allocation schemes  Paged memory allocation o Divides each incoming job into pages of equal size  Demand paging scheme o Pages brought into memory only as needed  Segmented memory allocation scheme o Each job divided into several segments (logical pieces), where the segments are different sizes  Segmented/demand paged memory o Combination of segmentation and demand paging  Virtual memory o Combination of RAM and disk space that running processes can use.  First­fit memory allocation ­ first partition fitting the requirements o Advantage: faster in...

Step 2 of 3

Chapter 9, Problem 15E is Solved
Step 3 of 3

Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 12
Author: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward
ISBN: 9780321696724

Other solutions

People also purchased

Related chapters

Unlock Textbook Solution

Enter your email below to unlock your verified solution to:

(a)What is meant by the term electron domain? (b) Explain