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Shapes and Polarity of Polyatomic Molecules

Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321696724 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward ISBN: 9780321696724 27

Solution for problem 38E Chapter 9

Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition

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Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321696724 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward

Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition

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Problem 38E

Problem 38E

Shapes and Polarity of Polyatomic Molecules (Section)

Consider a molecule with formula AX3. Supposing the A—X bond is polar, how would you expect the dipole moment of the AX3 molecule to change as the X—A—X bond angle increases from 100° to 120°?

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CEM 141 Lecture 31: Intermolecular Forces Dr. Jian Hu November 16 , 2016 Steps for Determining Molecular Polarity 1. Draw the Lewis Structure 2. Determine the electron center geometry 3. Determine the molecular shape 4. Determine the bond polarities 5. Add up the bond polarities (accounting for direction, because they are vector quantities) 6. Determine the molecular polarity  Examples: BH is 3onpolar, CF is 4onpolar, CH F is3polar, SO is 3olar Intermolecular Forces and Properties  Melting and boiling points indicate the strength of molecular interactions  In noble gases, LDFs are the only interactions present  Certain molecules can have similar sizes but very different boiling points  indicating various strengths of interactions  Three types of Intermolecular Forces (IMFs): London dispersion forces, dipole-dipole interactions, Hydrogen bonds  London Dispersion Forces: occur due to temporary fluctuations of the electron cloud; they depend on size, surface area, and shape of the molecule; they are the only interaction present in nonpolar molecules, they are present among all substances in the gas or liquid state, and they can occur between either entire molecules or individual atoms; they are usually the only forces present in hydrocarbons  Since HCl is polar, it may take up a certain arrangement when molecules come close to one another such that the positives and negatives are attracted by dipole-dipole interactions Below is an image o

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Chapter 9, Problem 38E is Solved
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Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 12
Author: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward
ISBN: 9780321696724

The full step-by-step solution to problem: 38E from chapter: 9 was answered by , our top Chemistry solution expert on 04/03/17, 07:58AM. Chemistry: The Central Science was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321696724. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science, edition: 12. Since the solution to 38E from 9 chapter was answered, more than 440 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. This full solution covers the following key subjects: molecule, Bond, angle, consider, dipole. This expansive textbook survival guide covers 49 chapters, and 5471 solutions. The answer to “Shapes and Polarity of Polyatomic Molecules (Section)Consider a molecule with formula AX3. Supposing the A—X bond is polar, how would you expect the dipole moment of the AX3 molecule to change as the X—A—X bond angle increases from 100° to 120°?” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 41 words.

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