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A historian discovers a nineteenth-century notebook in which some observations, dated

Chemistry: The Central Science | 11th Edition | ISBN: 9780136006176 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown, H. Eugene H LeMay, Bruce E. Bursten, Catherine Murphy, Patrick Woodward ISBN: 9780136006176 365

Solution for problem 7.104 Chapter 7

Chemistry: The Central Science | 11th Edition

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Chemistry: The Central Science | 11th Edition | ISBN: 9780136006176 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown, H. Eugene H LeMay, Bruce E. Bursten, Catherine Murphy, Patrick Woodward

Chemistry: The Central Science | 11th Edition

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Problem 7.104

A historian discovers a nineteenth-century notebook in which some observations, dated 1822, on a substance thought to be a new element, were recorded. Here are some of the data recorded in the notebook: Ductile, silverwhite, metallic looking. Softer than lead. Unaffected by water. Stable in air. Melting point: 153 oc Density: 7.3 g/ cm3 . Electrical conductivity: 20% that of copper. Hardness: About 1% as hard as iron. When 4.20 g of the unknown is heated in an excess of oxygen, 5.08 g of a white solid is formed. The solid could be sublimed by heating to over 800 oc. (a) Using information in the text and a handbook of chemistry, and making allowances for possible variations in numbers from current values, identify the element reported. (b) Write a balanced chemical equation for the reaction with oxygen. (c) Judging from Figure 7.2, might this nineteenth-century investigator have been the first to discover a new element?

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Chapter Four Dalton Model of the Atom ● John Dalton proposed that all matter is made up of tiny particles ● These particles are molecules or atoms ● Molecules can be broken down into atoms by chemical processes ● Atoms cannot be broken down by chemical or physical processes Chemistry Connection: John Dalton ● Dalton began teaching...

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Chapter 7, Problem 7.104 is Solved
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Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 11
Author: Theodore E. Brown, H. Eugene H LeMay, Bruce E. Bursten, Catherine Murphy, Patrick Woodward
ISBN: 9780136006176

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