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Solved: How does the Lewis model for covalent bonding

Chemistry: A Molecular Approach | 3rd Edition | ISBN: 9780321809247 | Authors: Nivaldo J. Tro ISBN: 9780321809247 1

Solution for problem 18E Chapter 9

Chemistry: A Molecular Approach | 3rd Edition

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Chemistry: A Molecular Approach | 3rd Edition | ISBN: 9780321809247 | Authors: Nivaldo J. Tro

Chemistry: A Molecular Approach | 3rd Edition

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Problem 18E

Problem 18E

How does the Lewis model for covalent bonding account for the relatively low melting and boiling points of molecular compounds (compared to ionic compounds)?

Step-by-Step Solution:
Step 1 of 3

Solution 18E The ionic bonds that we can find in ionic compounds are non directional because the coulombic force acts in the same way in the three dimensions, thus allowing the formation of ordered structures of ions called lattices, in which positive ions alternate to negative ions and vice-versa. This means that electrostatic interaction doesn’t act only between a couple of ions having opposite charges, but even between ions that are more distant in the same lattice, despite of the direction we consider. Since the coulombic force acts in all directions, the ions in lattice are binded with a higher energy, hence the melting points for ionic compound will be higher, because the heat ( a form of energy) we need to destroy these interactions need to be high. Covalent bond between two atoms is highly directional, thus the interactions between molecules will be weak if we consider a 3D structure, so it won’t be necessary a high amount of energy to break them. This is why covalent compounds have higher values of melting and boiling points respect to covalent compounds.

Step 2 of 3

Chapter 9, Problem 18E is Solved
Step 3 of 3

Textbook: Chemistry: A Molecular Approach
Edition: 3
Author: Nivaldo J. Tro
ISBN: 9780321809247

The full step-by-step solution to problem: 18E from chapter: 9 was answered by , our top Chemistry solution expert on 02/22/17, 04:35PM. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: A Molecular Approach, edition: 3. The answer to “How does the Lewis model for covalent bonding account for the relatively low melting and boiling points of molecular compounds (compared to ionic compounds)?” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 24 words. Since the solution to 18E from 9 chapter was answered, more than 392 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. This full solution covers the following key subjects: compounds, lewis, Bonding, compared, account. This expansive textbook survival guide covers 82 chapters, and 9454 solutions. Chemistry: A Molecular Approach was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321809247.

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Solved: How does the Lewis model for covalent bonding