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A layer of oil 1.50 mm thick is placed between two microscope slides. Researchers find

College Physics for AP® Courses | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9781938168932 | Authors: Gregg Wolfe, Irina Lyublinskaya, Douglas Ingram ISBN: 9781938168932 372

Solution for problem 41 Chapter 12

College Physics for AP® Courses | 1st Edition

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College Physics for AP® Courses | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9781938168932 | Authors: Gregg Wolfe, Irina Lyublinskaya, Douglas Ingram

College Physics for AP® Courses | 1st Edition

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Problem 41

A layer of oil 1.50 mm thick is placed between two microscope slides. Researchers find that a force of 5.50104 N is required to glide one over the other at a speed of 1.00 cm/s when their contact area is 6.00 cm2 . What is the oil's viscosity? What type of oil might it be?

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PHYS 1961 SEC 001 October 14, 2016 Group Members:, Lynn Vorwick, Jeffrey Stuart, Evan Zangakis Ji Soo Lee Newton’s 2 Law Introduction Newton’s work on kinematics led to the development of three fundamental laws he found to be true. His second law ( ) explains how the acceleration of an object is caused by the sum of ΣF=ma the forces acting on it with relation to its mass. His first law tells us that if the forces acting on an object cancel each other out, then the acceleration is zeΣF=0 ). Newton’s third law says that when one object exerts a force on another, the second object pushes back with the same force. In this lab, we used nd Newton’s 2 lab to analyze how applied force and the mass of a system determine it’s acceleration. Specifically, we used a hanging weight to accelerate a cart along an air track, connected by a string over a pulley. We plotted our data in tables and graphs and used the data we found to make predictions on what would happen in the cases where the forces we used became either very small or very large. ΣF=ma (1) Where ΣF is the sum of the forces acting on the object, m is the mass, and a is the acceleration. In this experiment we also used the PASCO Capstone program which collected the data from our experiment and was used to analyze it. Procedure Figure 1: mass 1 (m1) represents the cart on the air track, attached to a pulley strung around a wheel with the hanging mass (m2) that was suspended

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Chapter 12, Problem 41 is Solved
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Textbook: College Physics for AP® Courses
Edition: 1
Author: Gregg Wolfe, Irina Lyublinskaya, Douglas Ingram
ISBN: 9781938168932

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A layer of oil 1.50 mm thick is placed between two microscope slides. Researchers find