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Figure shows the radial probability distribution functions

Chemistry: A Molecular Approach | 3rd Edition | ISBN: 9780321809247 | Authors: Nivaldo J. Tro ISBN: 9780321809247 1

Solution for problem 81AE Chapter 7

Chemistry: A Molecular Approach | 3rd Edition

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Chemistry: A Molecular Approach | 3rd Edition | ISBN: 9780321809247 | Authors: Nivaldo J. Tro

Chemistry: A Molecular Approach | 3rd Edition

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Problem 81AE

Figure shows the radial probability distribution functions for the 2s orbitals and 2p orbitals, (a) Which orbital. 2s or 2p, has more electron density close to the nucleus? (b) How would you modify Slater's rules to adjust for the difference in electronic penetration of the nucleus for the 2s and 2p orbitals? A Figure Comparison of 1s. 2s. and 2p radial probability functions. Based on this figure, is it possible for an electron in a 2s orbital to be closer to the nucleus than an electron in a 1 s orbital? (a) If the core electrons were totally effective at screening the valence electrons and the valence electrons provided no screening for each other, what would be the effective nuclear charge acting on the 3s and 3p valence electrons in P? (b) Repeat these calculations using Slater's rules, (c) Detailed calculations indicate that the effective nuclear charge is 5.6+ for the 3s electrons and 4.9+ for the 3p electrons. Why are the values for the 3s and 3p electrons different? (d) If you remove a single electron from a P atom, which orbital will it come from?

Step-by-Step Solution:

Solution Step 1 The effective nuclear charge Zeff=Z-S Where Z is atomic number S is screening constant Assuming that core electrons contribute 1.00 and valence electrons contribute 0.00 to the screening constant S for 3s electron in P can be found as given below For P,electronic configuration is 1s 2s 2p 3s 3p2 3 Thus the number of core electron are 10 Thus Zeff=15-10=5 The effective nuclear charge on 3p electrons will also be 5 c)

Step 3 of 3

Chapter 7, Problem 81AE is Solved
Textbook: Chemistry: A Molecular Approach
Edition: 3
Author: Nivaldo J. Tro
ISBN: 9780321809247

Chemistry: A Molecular Approach was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321809247. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 81AE from chapter: 7 was answered by , our top Chemistry solution expert on 02/22/17, 04:35PM. This full solution covers the following key subjects: electrons, electron, orbital, figure, valence. This expansive textbook survival guide covers 82 chapters, and 9464 solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: A Molecular Approach, edition: 3. Since the solution to 81AE from 7 chapter was answered, more than 858 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. The answer to “Figure shows the radial probability distribution functions for the 2s orbitals and 2p orbitals, (a) Which orbital. 2s or 2p, has more electron density close to the nucleus? (b) How would you modify Slater's rules to adjust for the difference in electronic penetration of the nucleus for the 2s and 2p orbitals? A Figure Comparison of 1s. 2s. and 2p radial probability functions. Based on this figure, is it possible for an electron in a 2s orbital to be closer to the nucleus than an electron in a 1 s orbital? (a) If the core electrons were totally effective at screening the valence electrons and the valence electrons provided no screening for each other, what would be the effective nuclear charge acting on the 3s and 3p valence electrons in P? (b) Repeat these calculations using Slater's rules, (c) Detailed calculations indicate that the effective nuclear charge is 5.6+ for the 3s electrons and 4.9+ for the 3p electrons. Why are the values for the 3s and 3p electrons different? (d) If you remove a single electron from a P atom, which orbital will it come from?” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 187 words.

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