When hydrogen sulfide, H2S, gas is bubbled through a solution of lead(II) nitrate

Chapter 6, Problem 65

(choose chapter or problem)

Get Unlimited Answers
QUESTION:

When hydrogen sulfide, \(\mathrm{H}_{2} \mathrm{~S}\), gas is bubbled through a solution of lead(II) nitrate, \(\mathrm{Pb}\left(\mathrm{NO}_{3}\right)_{2}\), a black precipitate of lead(II) sulfide, PbS, forms, and nitric acid, \(\mathrm{HNO}_{3}\), is produced. Write the unbalanced chemical equation for this reaction.

Questions & Answers

QUESTION:

When hydrogen sulfide, \(\mathrm{H}_{2} \mathrm{~S}\), gas is bubbled through a solution of lead(II) nitrate, \(\mathrm{Pb}\left(\mathrm{NO}_{3}\right)_{2}\), a black precipitate of lead(II) sulfide, PbS, forms, and nitric acid, \(\mathrm{HNO}_{3}\), is produced. Write the unbalanced chemical equation for this reaction.

ANSWER:

Step 1 of 3

Precipitation reactions

Reactions in which the mixing of two solutions produces an insoluble solid substance are called precipitation reactions. The minimum concentration of the reactants required for precipitation is decided from the solubility product of the precipitate.

A precipitation reaction is an example of a double displacement reaction in which the ions of the acid and the base combine to form an insoluble salt.

Precipitation reactions form the basis of qualitative chemical analysis. Titrations involving precipitation reactions are carried out to find the concentration of the analyte. Quantitative analysis methods like gravimetry also use precipitation to find ion concentration in the solution.

Add to cart


Study Tools You Might Need

Not The Solution You Need? Search for Your Answer Here:

×

Login

Login or Sign up for access to all of our study tools and educational content!

Forgot password?
Register Now

×

Register

Sign up for access to all content on our site!

Or login if you already have an account

×

Reset password

If you have an active account we’ll send you an e-mail for password recovery

Or login if you have your password back