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Give an alternative proof of Proposition 13.1 in which you use list counting instead of

Mathematics: A Discrete Introduction | 3rd Edition | ISBN: 9780840049421 | Authors: Edward A. Scheinerman ISBN: 9780840049421 447

Solution for problem 13.1 Chapter 13

Mathematics: A Discrete Introduction | 3rd Edition

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Mathematics: A Discrete Introduction | 3rd Edition | ISBN: 9780840049421 | Authors: Edward A. Scheinerman

Mathematics: A Discrete Introduction | 3rd Edition

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Problem 13.1

Give an alternative proof of Proposition 13.1 in which you use list counting instead of subset counting.

Step-by-Step Solution:
Step 1 of 3

Chapter 1 Notes Section 1.1­ Sampling ● Statistics ○ Collecting data, displaying data and drawing conclusions ● Population: ○ The entire collection (ex: Clemson University) ● Sample: ○ Subset of the population (ex: Athletes at Clemson) ● Sample Types ○ Simple Random Sample (SRS):​ everything has an equal chance of being selected (ex: lottery) ○ Stratified Sample:​ population divided into groups that are similar then from the groups a SRS is taken ○ Cluster Sample:​ grouped into categories then pick one whole group to sample ○ Systematic Sample:​ items are ordered then decided how frequently to pick items (ex: every 5th item) ○ Voluntary Sample:​ asking people to give you an opinion; not reliable ● Statistics and Parameters ○ S​tatistic: describes a ​s​ample ○ P​arameter: describes a ​p​opulation Section 1.2­ Types of Data ● Information is collected on ​individuals​ (ex: people, places, animals, etc) ● The characteristic of the data collected is considered the ​variable​ (ex: hair color, race, political views, gender, etc) ● Values of the variables are the ​data ● Quantitative and Qualitative Variables ○ Quantitative Variables:​ numeric values (ex: height, goals scored, etc) ■ Discrete:​ can be listed (ex: number of fouls in a game)

Step 2 of 3

Chapter 13, Problem 13.1 is Solved
Step 3 of 3

Textbook: Mathematics: A Discrete Introduction
Edition: 3
Author: Edward A. Scheinerman
ISBN: 9780840049421

This full solution covers the following key subjects: . This expansive textbook survival guide covers 69 chapters, and 1110 solutions. The answer to “Give an alternative proof of Proposition 13.1 in which you use list counting instead of subset counting.” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 17 words. Mathematics: A Discrete Introduction was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780840049421. Since the solution to 13.1 from 13 chapter was answered, more than 458 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Mathematics: A Discrete Introduction, edition: 3. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 13.1 from chapter: 13 was answered by , our top Math solution expert on 03/15/18, 06:06PM.

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Give an alternative proof of Proposition 13.1 in which you use list counting instead of