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In how many ways can we arrange a standard deck of 52 cards so that all cards in a given

Mathematics: A Discrete Introduction | 3rd Edition | ISBN: 9780840049421 | Authors: Edward A. Scheinerman ISBN: 9780840049421 447

Solution for problem 5 Chapter 2

Mathematics: A Discrete Introduction | 3rd Edition

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Mathematics: A Discrete Introduction | 3rd Edition | ISBN: 9780840049421 | Authors: Edward A. Scheinerman

Mathematics: A Discrete Introduction | 3rd Edition

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Problem 5

In how many ways can we arrange a standard deck of 52 cards so that all cards in a given suit appear contiguously (e.g., first all the spades appear, then all the diamonds, then all the hearts, and then all the clubs)?

Step-by-Step Solution:
Step 1 of 3

MGF 1107 Pre-Class Assignment 1A Read through section 1A in your book, take notes and answer the following question. List and define the 10 fallacies: 1.) Straw man: When the original claims message becomes distorted through a hole in the claim itself. 2.) Appeal to popularity: The use of a popular item/ trend by using limited information about the product to make it seem more appealing to an audience. 3.) Diversion (red herring): A claim that seems to go off track and tie into another claim. 4.) Appeal to emotion: Makes a claim while engaging in pathos. 5.) Appeal to ignorance: By making a claim that has no evidence proving the claim, therefore dismissing the previous claim. 6.) Hasty generalization: Using a general area/ subject and finding it the cause of a certain response/ action. 7.) False cause: A claim that leads one thing is associated to another from an unrelated response. 8.) Limited choice: Since one does not believe in a certain claim that person/ idea is given a label. 9.) Personal attack: How one actions can not only effect you, but others as well by causing some form of damage. 10.) Circular reasoning: A claim that is made and goes back to the original claim.

Step 2 of 3

Chapter 2, Problem 5 is Solved
Step 3 of 3

Textbook: Mathematics: A Discrete Introduction
Edition: 3
Author: Edward A. Scheinerman
ISBN: 9780840049421

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In how many ways can we arrange a standard deck of 52 cards so that all cards in a given