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A normal shock propagates at 2000 ft/s into the still air ina tube. The temperature and

Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9781119080701 | Authors: Philip M. Gerhart, Andrew L. Gerhart, John I. Hochstein ISBN: 9781119080701 456

Solution for problem 11.33 Chapter 11.5

Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics | 8th Edition

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Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9781119080701 | Authors: Philip M. Gerhart, Andrew L. Gerhart, John I. Hochstein

Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics | 8th Edition

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Problem 11.33

A normal shock propagates at 2000 ft/s into the still air ina tube. The temperature and pressure of the air are 80 F and 14.7psia before hit by the shock. Calculate the air temperature, pressure,and velocity after the shock, the stagnation temperature andpressure relative to the shock ahead of and behind the shock, andthe stagnation temperature and pressure relative to the tube aheadof and behind the shock.

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Climate: Why organisms live where they do  Physical factors drive the distribution of organisms o Light o Temperature o Precipitation  Global climate is driven by o Sunlight (tropics) o Movement of planet o Atmospheric and ocean circulation  Primary driver of climate o The sun  More intense at tropical latitudes  Because of vertical rays  As air rises and cools, it loses moisture = rain o Air moving upward at equator creates inter-tropical Convergence Zone o Dry cold air is dense, picks up moisture o Hadley cells are generated by ITCZ  Prevailing winds that blow east and west are generated by The Coriolis Force o Deflection of air mass is behind direction of spin o Tradewinds develop by moving slower to faster  Forces also affect ocean circulation o Shallow currents driven by prevailing winds o Large scale gyres (movement of water) driven by coriolis forces  Changes in ocean circulation can have huge impact on climate o El Niño southern oscillation  Non el nino  Warm water piles up on Western side (Pacific)  Water comes from below to replace water moved o Nutrient rich  Tradewinds stop, water on Western side moves to eastern side  Shuts down nutrient rich input

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Chapter 11.5, Problem 11.33 is Solved
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Textbook: Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics
Edition: 8
Author: Philip M. Gerhart, Andrew L. Gerhart, John I. Hochstein
ISBN: 9781119080701

Since the solution to 11.33 from 11.5 chapter was answered, more than 285 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. The answer to “A normal shock propagates at 2000 ft/s into the still air ina tube. The temperature and pressure of the air are 80 F and 14.7psia before hit by the shock. Calculate the air temperature, pressure,and velocity after the shock, the stagnation temperature andpressure relative to the shock ahead of and behind the shock, andthe stagnation temperature and pressure relative to the tube aheadof and behind the shock.” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 67 words. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics, edition: 8. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 11.33 from chapter: 11.5 was answered by , our top Science solution expert on 03/16/18, 03:21PM. This full solution covers the following key subjects: . This expansive textbook survival guide covers 112 chapters, and 1357 solutions. Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781119080701.

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A normal shock propagates at 2000 ft/s into the still air ina tube. The temperature and