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Three possible dihedral angles for H2O2 (0, 90, and 180) are shown in Fig. 1.6 on p. 19

Organic Chemistry | 6th Edition | ISBN: 9781936221349 | Authors: Marc Loudon, Jim Parise ISBN: 9781936221349 461

Solution for problem 1.42 Chapter 1

Organic Chemistry | 6th Edition

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Organic Chemistry | 6th Edition | ISBN: 9781936221349 | Authors: Marc Loudon, Jim Parise

Organic Chemistry | 6th Edition

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Problem 1.42

Three possible dihedral angles for H2O2 (0, 90, and 180) are shown in Fig. 1.6 on p. 19. (a) Assume that the H2O2 molecule exists predominantly in one of these arrangements. Which of the dihedral angles can be ruled out by the fact that H2O2 has a large dipole moment (2.13 D)? Explain. (b) The bond dipole moment of the OH bond is tabulated as 1.52 D. Use this fact and the overall dipole moment of H2O2 in part (a) to decide on the preferred dihedral angles in H2O2. Take the HOO bond angle to be the known value (96.5). (Hint: Apply the law of cosines.)

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Continued Chapter 2 Empirical and Molecular Formula Molecular formula- chemical formula of a substance (ex. C6H12O6) Empirical- simplest whole number (ex. CH2O) Types of Compounds Ionic Compound: - Cation and Anion - Metal and Nonmetal Molecular or Covalent Compound: - Nonmetal and Nonmetal - Ends in H Acid Compounds: - Chemical formula starts with H - Ex. of strong acids- HCl, HBr, HNo3, H2SO4, HI, HClO4 Base/Basic Compounds: - Metal and Hydroxide - (OH) is an alcohol when attached to a nonmetal Naming Ionic- known cation charge, unknown cation charge (transition metals)  known cation charge- element name + ion; anion- element name + -ide ending  unknown cation- element + ion (roman numeral); anion- element name + -ide ending Molec

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Chapter 1, Problem 1.42 is Solved
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Textbook: Organic Chemistry
Edition: 6
Author: Marc Loudon, Jim Parise
ISBN: 9781936221349

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Organic Chemistry, edition: 6. Organic Chemistry was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781936221349. Since the solution to 1.42 from 1 chapter was answered, more than 327 students have viewed the full step-by-step answer. This full solution covers the following key subjects: . This expansive textbook survival guide covers 239 chapters, and 1693 solutions. The full step-by-step solution to problem: 1.42 from chapter: 1 was answered by , our top Chemistry solution expert on 03/16/18, 03:35PM. The answer to “Three possible dihedral angles for H2O2 (0, 90, and 180) are shown in Fig. 1.6 on p. 19. (a) Assume that the H2O2 molecule exists predominantly in one of these arrangements. Which of the dihedral angles can be ruled out by the fact that H2O2 has a large dipole moment (2.13 D)? Explain. (b) The bond dipole moment of the OH bond is tabulated as 1.52 D. Use this fact and the overall dipole moment of H2O2 in part (a) to decide on the preferred dihedral angles in H2O2. Take the HOO bond angle to be the known value (96.5). (Hint: Apply the law of cosines.)” is broken down into a number of easy to follow steps, and 106 words.

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Three possible dihedral angles for H2O2 (0, 90, and 180) are shown in Fig. 1.6 on p. 19