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Solutions for Chapter 5: Inverse Functions: Exponential, Logarithmic, and Inverse Trigonometric Functions

Essential Calculus | 2nd Edition | ISBN: 9781133112297 | Authors: James Stewart

Full solutions for Essential Calculus | 2nd Edition

ISBN: 9781133112297

Essential Calculus | 2nd Edition | ISBN: 9781133112297 | Authors: James Stewart

Solutions for Chapter 5: Inverse Functions: Exponential, Logarithmic, and Inverse Trigonometric Functions

Solutions for Chapter 5
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Textbook: Essential Calculus
Edition: 2
Author: James Stewart
ISBN: 9781133112297

Summary of Chapter 5: Inverse Functions: Exponential, Logarithmic, and Inverse Trigonometric Functions

Here we investigate their properties, compute their derivatives, and use them to describe exponential growth and decay in biology, physics, chemistry, and other sciences. We also study the inverses of the trigonometric and hyperbolic functions. Finally we look at a method (l’Hospital’s Rule) for computing limits of such functions.

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 90 problems in chapter 5: Inverse Functions: Exponential, Logarithmic, and Inverse Trigonometric Functions have been answered, more than 26588 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 5: Inverse Functions: Exponential, Logarithmic, and Inverse Trigonometric Functions includes 90 full step-by-step solutions. Essential Calculus was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781133112297. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Essential Calculus, edition: 2.

Key Calculus Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Addition principle of probability.

    P(A or B) = P(A) + P(B) - P(A and B). If A and B are mutually exclusive events, then P(A or B) = P(A) + P(B)

  • Anchor

    See Mathematical induction.

  • Arccosine function

    See Inverse cosine function.

  • Event

    A subset of a sample space.

  • Interval notation

    Notation used to specify intervals, pp. 4, 5.

  • Logarithm

    An expression of the form logb x (see Logarithmic function)

  • Lower bound of f

    Any number b for which b < ƒ(x) for all x in the domain of ƒ

  • Measure of center

    A measure of the typical, middle, or average value for a data set

  • NINT (ƒ(x), x, a, b)

    A calculator approximation to ?ab ƒ(x)dx

  • Period

    See Periodic function.

  • Permutation

    An arrangement of elements of a set, in which order is important.

  • Power rule of logarithms

    logb Rc = c logb R, R 7 0.

  • Range of a function

    The set of all output values corresponding to elements in the domain.

  • Rational function

    Function of the form ƒ(x)/g(x) where ƒ(x) and g(x) are polynomials and g(x) is not the zero polynomial.

  • Reflection

    Two points that are symmetric with respect to a lineor a point.

  • Repeated zeros

    Zeros of multiplicity ? 2 (see Multiplicity).

  • Standard form: equation of a circle

    (x - h)2 + (y - k2) = r 2

  • Statistic

    A number that measures a quantitative variable for a sample from a population.

  • symmetric about the x-axis

    A graph in which (x, -y) is on the graph whenever (x, y) is; or a graph in which (r, -?) or (-r, ?, -?) is on the graph whenever (r, ?) is

  • Vertical line

    x = a.