×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Calculus - Textbook Survival Guide
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Calculus - Textbook Survival Guide

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

Solutions for Chapter 1.2: Physical Applications

Calculus: Early Transcendentals | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780321570567 | Authors: William L. Briggs, Lyle Cochran, Bernard Gillett

Full solutions for Calculus: Early Transcendentals | 1st Edition

ISBN: 9780321570567

Calculus: Early Transcendentals | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780321570567 | Authors: William L. Briggs, Lyle Cochran, Bernard Gillett

Solutions for Chapter 1.2: Physical Applications

Solutions for Chapter 1.2
4 5 0 312 Reviews
16
1
Textbook: Calculus: Early Transcendentals
Edition: 1
Author: William L. Briggs, Lyle Cochran, Bernard Gillett
ISBN: 9780321570567

Summary of Chapter 1.2: Physical Applications

A surface area problem is “between” a volume problem (which is threedimensional) and an arc length problem (which is one-dimensional)

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Calculus: Early Transcendentals, edition: 1. Calculus: Early Transcendentals was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321570567. Chapter 1.2: Physical Applications includes 67 full step-by-step solutions. Since 67 problems in chapter 1.2: Physical Applications have been answered, more than 430500 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Calculus Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Bounded

    A function is bounded if there are numbers b and B such that b ? ƒ(x) ? B for all x in the domain of f.

  • Cone

    See Right circular cone.

  • Constraints

    See Linear programming problem.

  • Ellipse

    The set of all points in the plane such that the sum of the distances from a pair of fixed points (the foci) is a constant

  • Head minus tail (HMT) rule

    An arrow with initial point (x1, y1 ) and terminal point (x2, y2) represents the vector <8x 2 - x 1, y2 - y19>

  • Initial value of a function

    ƒ 0.

  • Integers

    The numbers . . ., -3, -2, -1, 0,1,2,...2

  • Inverse secant function

    The function y = sec-1 x

  • Lemniscate

    A graph of a polar equation of the form r2 = a2 sin 2u or r 2 = a2 cos 2u.

  • Linear inequality in two variables x and y

    An inequality that can be written in one of the following forms: y 6 mx + b, y … mx + b, y 7 mx + b, or y Ú mx + b with m Z 0

  • Logistic growth function

    A model of population growth: ƒ1x2 = c 1 + a # bx or ƒ1x2 = c1 + ae-kx, where a, b, c, and k are positive with b < 1. c is the limit to growth

  • Magnitude of an arrow

    The magnitude of PQ is the distance between P and Q

  • Matrix, m x n

    A rectangular array of m rows and n columns of real numbers

  • Multiplication property of equality

    If u = v and w = z, then uw = vz

  • Opposite

    See Additive inverse of a real number and Additive inverse of a complex number.

  • Perihelion

    The closest point to the Sun in a planet’s orbit.

  • Probability of an event in a finite sample space of equally likely outcomes

    The number of outcomes in the event divided by the number of outcomes in the sample space.

  • Proportional

    See Power function

  • Solve by substitution

    Method for solving systems of linear equations.

  • Sum of complex numbers

    (a + bi) + (c + di) = (a + c) + (b + d)i