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Solutions for Chapter 14.7: Calculus: Early Transcendentals 1st Edition

Calculus: Early Transcendentals | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780321570567 | Authors: William L. Briggs, Lyle Cochran, Bernard Gillett

Full solutions for Calculus: Early Transcendentals | 1st Edition

ISBN: 9780321570567

Calculus: Early Transcendentals | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780321570567 | Authors: William L. Briggs, Lyle Cochran, Bernard Gillett

Solutions for Chapter 14.7

Solutions for Chapter 14.7
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Textbook: Calculus: Early Transcendentals
Edition: 1
Author: William L. Briggs, Lyle Cochran, Bernard Gillett
ISBN: 9780321570567

Calculus: Early Transcendentals was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321570567. Since 47 problems in chapter 14.7 have been answered, more than 118706 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 14.7 includes 47 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Calculus: Early Transcendentals, edition: 1.

Key Calculus Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Absolute value of a vector

    See Magnitude of a vector.

  • Angle

    Union of two rays with a common endpoint (the vertex). The beginning ray (the initial side) can be rotated about its endpoint to obtain the final position (the terminal side)

  • Bounded interval

    An interval that has finite length (does not extend to ? or -?)

  • Combinations of n objects taken r at a time

    There are nCr = n! r!1n - r2! such combinations,

  • Component form of a vector

    If a vector’s representative in standard position has a terminal point (a,b) (or (a, b, c)) , then (a,b) (or (a, b, c)) is the component form of the vector, and a and b are the horizontal and vertical components of the vector (or a, b, and c are the x-, y-, and z-components of the vector, respectively)

  • Confounding variable

    A third variable that affects either of two variables being studied, making inferences about causation unreliable

  • De Moivre’s theorem

    (r(cos ? + i sin ?))n = r n (cos n? + i sin n?)

  • End behavior asymptote of a rational function

    A polynomial that the function approaches as.

  • Explicitly defined sequence

    A sequence in which the kth term is given as a function of k.

  • Exponential decay function

    Decay modeled by ƒ(x) = a ? bx, a > 0 with 0 < b < 1.

  • Imaginary part of a complex number

    See Complex number.

  • Independent variable

    Variable representing the domain value of a function (usually x).

  • Inductive step

    See Mathematical induction.

  • Limaçon

    A graph of a polar equation r = a b sin u or r = a b cos u with a > 0 b > 0

  • Multiplication property of equality

    If u = v and w = z, then uw = vz

  • Quartic function

    A degree 4 polynomial function.

  • Quotient of functions

    a ƒ g b(x) = ƒ(x) g(x) , g(x) ? 0

  • Radian measure

    The measure of an angle in radians, or, for a central angle, the ratio of the length of the intercepted arc tothe radius of the circle.

  • Rational zeros theorem

    A procedure for finding the possible rational zeros of a polynomial.

  • Secant

    The function y = sec x.

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