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Solutions for Chapter 7.5SE: Chemistry: A Molecular Approach 3rd Edition

Chemistry: A Molecular Approach | 3rd Edition | ISBN: 9780321809247 | Authors: Nivaldo J. Tro

Full solutions for Chemistry: A Molecular Approach | 3rd Edition

ISBN: 9780321809247

Chemistry: A Molecular Approach | 3rd Edition | ISBN: 9780321809247 | Authors: Nivaldo J. Tro

Solutions for Chapter 7.5SE

Solutions for Chapter 7.5SE
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This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 7.5SE includes 2 full step-by-step solutions. Chemistry: A Molecular Approach was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321809247. Since 2 problems in chapter 7.5SE have been answered, more than 414790 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: A Molecular Approach, edition: 3.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Arene

    A term used to classify benzene and its derivatives.

  • Beer’s law

    The light absorbed by a substance (A) equals the product of its extinction coefficient 1e2, the path length through which the light passes (b), and the molar concentration of the substance (c): A = ebc. (Section 14.2)

  • bond order

    The number of bonding electron pairs shared between two atoms, minus the number of antibonding electron pairs: bond order = (number of bonding electrons - number of antibonding electrons)/2. (Section 9.7)

  • breeder reactor.

    A nuclear reactor that produces more fissionable materials than it uses. (19.5)

  • cathode rays

    Streams of electrons that are produced when a high voltage is applied to electrodes in an evacuated tube. (Section 2.2)

  • chemical bond

    A strong attractive force that exists between atoms in a molecule. (Section 8.1)

  • chemical kinetics

    The area of chemistry concerned with the speeds, or rates, at which chemical reactions occur. (Chapter 14: Introduction)

  • Coulomb’s law.

    The potential energy between two ions is directly proportional to the product of their charges and inversely proportional to the distance between them. (9.3)

  • dehydration

    An elimination reaction involving the loss of H and OH.

  • diamagnetism

    The circulation of electron density in the presence of an external magnetic field, which produces a local (induced) magnetic field that opposes the external magnetic field.

  • diffusion.

    The gradual mixing of molecules of one gas with the molecules of another by virtue of their kinetic properties. (5.7)

  • dipole–dipole force

    A force that becomes significant when polar molecules come in close contact with one another. The force is attractive when the positive end of one polar molecule approaches the negative end of another. (Section 11.2)

  • heat

    The flow of energy from a body at higher temperature to one at lower temperature when they are placed in thermal contact. (Section 5.1)

  • Heterocycle

    A cyclic compound whose ring contains more than one kind of atom. Oxirane (ethylene oxide), for example, is a heterocycle whose ring contains two carbon atoms and one oxygen atom.

  • hypothesis

    A tentative explanation of a series of observations or of a natural law. (Section 1.3)

  • liquid crystal

    A substance that exhibits one or more partially ordered liquid phases above the melting point of the solid form. By contrast, in nonliquid crystalline substances the liquid phase that forms upon melting is completely unordered. (Section 11.7)

  • Pauli exclusion principle

    The rule that states that an atomic orbital or molecular orbital can accommodate a maximum of two electrons with opposite spin.

  • Pro-S-hydrogen

    Replacing this hydrogen by deuterium gives a chiral center with an S confi guration

  • property

    A characteristic that gives a sample of matter its unique identity. (Section 1.1)

  • trivalent

    An element, such as nitrogen, that forms three bonds.

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