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Solutions for Chapter 12: Intermolecular Forces: Liquids, Solids, and Phase Changes

Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780077216504 | Authors: Martin S. Silberberg

Full solutions for Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change | 5th Edition

ISBN: 9780077216504

Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780077216504 | Authors: Martin S. Silberberg

Solutions for Chapter 12: Intermolecular Forces: Liquids, Solids, and Phase Changes

Solutions for Chapter 12
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Textbook: Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change
Edition: 5
Author: Martin S. Silberberg
ISBN: 9780077216504

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780077216504. Since 145 problems in chapter 12: Intermolecular Forces: Liquids, Solids, and Phase Changes have been answered, more than 104014 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change, edition: 5. Chapter 12: Intermolecular Forces: Liquids, Solids, and Phase Changes includes 145 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • aliphatic hydrocarbons.

    Hydrocarbons that do not contain the benzene group or the benzene ring. (24.1)

  • alkynes

    Compounds containing a carbon-carbon triple bond.

  • anti conformation

    A conformation in which the dihedral angle between two groups is 180°.

  • autocatalytic

    A reaction for which the reagent necessary to catalyze the reaction is produced by the reaction itself.

  • Born–Haber cycle

    A thermodynamic cycle based on Hess’s law that relates the lattice energy of an ionic substance to its enthalpy of formation and to other measurable quantities. (Section 8.2)

  • copolymer.

    A polymer containing two or more different monomers. (25.2)

  • double helix

    The structure for DNA that involves the winding of two DNA polynucleotide chains together in a helical arrangement. The two strands of the double helix are complementary in that the organic bases on the two strands are paired for optimal hydrogen bond interaction. (Section 24.10)

  • heat capacity

    The quantity of heat required to raise the temperature of a sample of matter by 1 °C (or 1 K). (Section 5.5)

  • hydroboration-oxidation

    A twostep process that achieves an anti-Markovnikov addition of a proton and a hydroxyl group (OH) across an alkene.

  • Keq

    A term that describes the position of equilibrium for a reaction: Keq = 3H3O+ 4 3A- 4 3HA4 3H2O4

  • lock-and-key model

    A model of enzyme action in which the substrate molecule is pictured as fitting rather specifically into the active site on the enzyme. It is assumed that in being bound to the active site, the substrate is somehow activated for reaction. (Section 14.7)

  • mass spectrometry

    The study ofthe interaction between matter and an energysource other than electromagnetic radiation. Massspectrometry is used primarily to determine the molecular weight and molecular formula of a compound.

  • Polysaccharide

    A carbohydrate containing a large number of monosaccharide units, each joined to the next by one or more glycosidic bonds.

  • primary structure

    For proteins, the sequence of amino acid residues.

  • proteins

    Polypeptide chains comprised of more than 40 or 50 amino acids.

  • Substitution

    A reaction in which an atom or group of atoms in a compound is replaced by another atom or group of atoms.

  • symmetry forbidden

    A reaction that disobeys conservation of orbital symmetry.

  • Thermodynamic control

    Experimental conditions that permit the establishment of equilibrium between two or more products of a reaction. The composition of the product mixture is determined by the relative stabilities of the products.

  • Vicinal coupling

    a !CH"CH2 group

  • Zaitsev’s rule

    A rule stating that the major product of a b-elimination reaction is the most stable alkene; that is, it is the alkene with the greatest number of substituents on the carboncarbon double bond

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