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Solutions for Chapter 19: Ionic Equilibria in Aqueous Systems

Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780077216504 | Authors: Martin S. Silberberg

Full solutions for Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change | 5th Edition

ISBN: 9780077216504

Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9780077216504 | Authors: Martin S. Silberberg

Solutions for Chapter 19: Ionic Equilibria in Aqueous Systems

Solutions for Chapter 19
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Textbook: Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change
Edition: 5
Author: Martin S. Silberberg
ISBN: 9780077216504

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change, edition: 5. Chapter 19: Ionic Equilibria in Aqueous Systems includes 156 full step-by-step solutions. Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780077216504. Since 156 problems in chapter 19: Ionic Equilibria in Aqueous Systems have been answered, more than 104812 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • activity series

    A list of metals in order of decreasing ease of oxidation. (Section 4.4)

  • atmosphere (atm)

    A unit of pressure equal to 760 torr; 1 atm = 101.325 kPa. (Section 10.2) atom The smallest representative particle of an element. (Sections 1.1 and 2.1)

  • Carboxylic ester

    A derivative of a carboxylic acid in which H of the carboxyl group is replaced by a carbon.

  • cathode rays

    Streams of electrons that are produced when a high voltage is applied to electrodes in an evacuated tube. (Section 2.2)

  • diamagnetism

    A type of magnetism that causes a substance with no unpaired electrons to be weakly repelled from a magnetic field. (Section 9.8)

  • E (Section 5.2C)

    From the German, entgegen, opposite. Specifi es that groups of higher priority on the carbons of a double bond are on opposite sides

  • Haloalkene (vinylic halide)

    A compound containing a halogen atom bonded to one of the carbons of a carbon-carbon double bond.

  • Heat of combustion (DH0 )

    Standard heat of combustion is the heat released when one mole of a substance in its standard state (gas, liquid, solid) is oxidized completely to carbon dioxide and water.

  • Heterocyclic amine

    An amine in which nitrogen is one of the atoms of a ring

  • Hückel’s rule

    The requirement for an odd number of p electron pairs in order for a compound to be aromatic.

  • intermediate

    A structure corresponding to a local minimum (valley) in an energy diagram.

  • Ionization potential (IP)

    The minimum energy required to remove an electron from an atom or molecule to a distance where there is no electrostatic interaction between the resulting ion and electron.

  • Oxidation

    The loss of electrons. Alternatively, either the loss of hydrogens, the gain of oxygens, or both.

  • polymer

    A large molecule of high molecular mass, formed by the joining together, or polymerization, of a large number of molecules of low molecular mass. The individual molecules forming the polymer are called monomers. (Sections 12.1 and 12.8)

  • precipitate

    An insoluble substance that forms in, and separates from, a solution. (Section 4.2)

  • radioactive decay chain

    A series of nuclear reactions that begins with an unstable nucleus and terminates with a stable one. Also called nuclear disintegration series. (Section 21.2)

  • rearrangement

    One of the four arrow-pushing patterns for ionic reactions.

  • reduction

    A process in which a substance gains one or more electrons. (Section 4.4)

  • secondary structure

    The manner in which a protein is coiled or stretched. (Section 24.7)

  • Zaitsev’s rule

    A rule stating that the major product of a b-elimination reaction is the most stable alkene; that is, it is the alkene with the greatest number of substituents on the carboncarbon double bond

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