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Solutions for Chapter 7: Quantum Theory and the Electronic Structure of Atoms

Chemistry | 11th Edition | ISBN: 9780073402680 | Authors: Raymond Chang

Full solutions for Chemistry | 11th Edition

ISBN: 9780073402680

Chemistry | 11th Edition | ISBN: 9780073402680 | Authors: Raymond Chang

Solutions for Chapter 7: Quantum Theory and the Electronic Structure of Atoms

Solutions for Chapter 7
4 5 0 366 Reviews
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Textbook: Chemistry
Edition: 11
Author: Raymond Chang
ISBN: 9780073402680

Summary of Chapter 7: Quantum Theory and the Electronic Structure of Atoms

We begin by discussing the transition from classical physics to quantum theory. In particular, we become familiar with properties of waves and electromagnetic radiation and Planck’s formulation of the quantum theory.

Since 180 problems in chapter 7: Quantum Theory and the Electronic Structure of Atoms have been answered, more than 1243517 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 7: Quantum Theory and the Electronic Structure of Atoms includes 180 full step-by-step solutions. Chemistry was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073402680. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry, edition: 11.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • a-Helix

    A type of secondary structure in which a section of polypeptide chain coils into a spiral, most commonly a right-handed spiral.

  • Allylic carbon

    A carbon adjacent to a carbon-carbon double bond.

  • Chemical shift (d)

    The shift in parts per million of an NMR signal relative to the signal of TMS

  • enzymes

    Important biological molecules that catalyze virtually all cellular processes.

  • ferrimagnetism

    A form of magnetism in which unpaired electron spins on different-type ions point in opposite directions but do not fully cancel out. (Section 23.1)

  • gas constant (R)

    The constant of proportionality in the ideal-gas equation. (Section 10.4)

  • Glycoside

    A carbohydrate in which the !OH on its anomeric carbon is replaced by !OR

  • High-resolution mass spectrometry

    Instrumentation that is capable of separating ions that differ in mass by as little as 0.0001 amu

  • homogeneous catalyst

    A catalyst that is in the same phase as the reactant substances. (Section 14.7)

  • ideal gas

    A hypothetical gas whose pressure, volume, and temperature behavior is completely described by the ideal-gas equation. (Section 10.4)

  • Kinetic control

    Experimental conditions under which the composition of the product mixture is determined by the relative rates of formation of each product.

  • mass defect

    The difference between the mass of a nucleus and the total masses of the individual nucleons that it contains. (Section 21.6)

  • nitrogen rule

    In mass spectrometry, an odd molecular weight indicates an odd number of nitrogen atoms in the compound, while an even molecular weight indicates either an even number of nitrogen atoms or the absence of nitrogen.

  • radioactive decay chain

    A series of nuclear reactions that begins with an unstable nucleus and terminates with a stable one. Also called nuclear disintegration series. (Section 21.2)

  • resolving agents

    A compound that can be used to achieve the resolution of enantiomers.

  • rotational motion

    Movement of a molecule as though it is spinning like a top. (Section 19.3)

  • sulfoxide

    A compound containing an SRO bond that is flanked on both sides by R groups.

  • thermosetting resins

    Highly crosslinked polymers that are generally very hard and insoluble.

  • Valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR)

    A method for predicting bond angles based on the idea that electron pairs repel each other and keep as far apart as possible.

  • Zaitsev’s rule

    A rule stating that the major product of a b-elimination reaction is the most stable alkene; that is, it is the alkene with the greatest number of substituents on the carboncarbon double bond