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Solutions for Chapter 23: Transition Metals Chemistry and Coordination Compounds

Chemistry | 11th Edition | ISBN: 9780073402680 | Authors: Raymond Chang

Full solutions for Chemistry | 11th Edition

ISBN: 9780073402680

Chemistry | 11th Edition | ISBN: 9780073402680 | Authors: Raymond Chang

Solutions for Chapter 23: Transition Metals Chemistry and Coordination Compounds

Solutions for Chapter 23
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Textbook: Chemistry
Edition: 11
Author: Raymond Chang
ISBN: 9780073402680

Summary of Chapter 23: Transition Metals Chemistry and Coordination Compounds

We see that the structure of coordination compounds can give rise to geometric and/or optical isomers. We become acquainted with the use of a polarimeter in studying optical isomers.

Chemistry was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073402680. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry, edition: 11. Since 85 problems in chapter 23: Transition Metals Chemistry and Coordination Compounds have been answered, more than 1128475 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 23: Transition Metals Chemistry and Coordination Compounds includes 85 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • allylic carbocation

    A carbocation in which the positive charge is adjacent to a carbon-carbon double bond.

  • angstrom

    A common non-SI unit of length, denoted Å, that is used to measure atomic dimensions: 1Å = 10-10 m. (Section 2.3)

  • Chain propagation

    A step in a chain reaction characterized by the reaction of a reactive intermediate and a molecule to give a new reactive intermediate and a new molecule.

  • chromophore

    In UV-Vis spectroscopy, the region of the molecule responsible for the absorption (the conjugated p system).

  • complex ion.

    An ion containing a central metal cation bonded to one or more molecules or ions. (16.10)

  • Diaxial interactions

    Refers to the steric strain arising from interaction between an axial substituent and an axial hydrogen (or other group) on the same side of a chair conformation of a cyclohexane ring

  • eicosanoids

    A class of lipids which includes leukotrienes, prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and prostacyclins.

  • Frequency

    The number of full cycles of a wave that pass a given point in a second, and reported in hertz (Hz), which has the units s21

  • fusion

    The joining of two light nuclei to form a more massive one. (Section 21.6)

  • Haworth projection

    A way to view furanose and pyranose forms of monosaccharides. The ring is drawn fl at and most commonly viewed through its edge with the anomeric carbon on the right and the oxygen atom of the ring to the rear

  • heat of sublimation

    The enthalpy change, ?H, for vaporization of a solid. (Section 11.4)

  • ionizing radiation

    Radiation that has sufficient energy to remove an electron from a molecule, thereby ionizing it. (Section 21.9)

  • mean free path

    The average distance traveled by a gas molecule between collisions. (Section 10.8)

  • metallic character

    The extent to which an element exhibits the physical and chemical properties characteristic of metals, for example, luster, malleability, ductility, and good thermal and electrical conductivity. (Section 7.6)

  • methylene group

    A CH2 group.

  • Michael acceptor

    The electrophile in a Michael reaction.

  • molality

    The concentration of a solution expressed as moles of solute per kilogram of solvent; abbreviated m. (Section 13.4)

  • Phenyl group

    A group derived by removing an H from benzene; abbreviated C6H5! or Ph!.

  • Rearrangement

    A change in connectivity of the atoms in a product compared with the con nectivity of the same atoms in the starting material.

  • Signal

    A recording in an NMR spectrum of a nuclear magnetic resonance