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Solutions for Chapter 2: Atoms, Molecules, and Ions

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition | ISBN: 9780134414232 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus

Full solutions for Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition

ISBN: 9780134414232

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition | ISBN: 9780134414232 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus

Solutions for Chapter 2: Atoms, Molecules, and Ions

Solutions for Chapter 2
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Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 14
Author: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus
ISBN: 9780134414232

Summary of Chapter 2: Atoms, Molecules, and Ions

Introduce the basic structure of atoms and discuss the formation of molecules and ions.

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science, edition: 14. Chemistry: The Central Science was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780134414232. Since 114 problems in chapter 2: Atoms, Molecules, and Ions have been answered, more than 27572 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 2: Atoms, Molecules, and Ions includes 114 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • amino acid

    A compound containing a carboxylic acid group (COOH) as well as an amino group (NH2).

  • anion

    A negatively charged ion. (Section 2.7)

  • antibonding molecular orbital.

    A molecular orbital that is of higher energy and lower stability than the atomic orbitals from which it was formed. (10.6)

  • Axial bond

    A bond to a chair conformation of cyclohexane that extends from the ring parallel to the imaginary axis through the center of the ring; a bond that lies roughly perpendicular to the equator of the ring.

  • buffered solution (buffer)

    A solution that undergoes a limited change in pH upon addition of a small amount of acid or base. (Section 17.2)

  • Enantiotopic groups

    Atoms or groups on an atom that give a chiral center when one of the groups is replaced by another group. A pair of enantiomers results. The hydrogens of the CH2 group of ethanol, for example, are enantiotopic. Replacing one of them by deuterium gives (R)-1-deuteroethanol; replacing the other gives (S)-1-deuteroethanol. Enantiotopic groups have identical chemical shifts in achiral environments but different chemical shifts in chiral environments.

  • ether

    A compound with the structure R!O!R.

  • fishhook arrow

    A curved arrow with only one barb, indicating the motion of just one electron (also see Sect. 11.1).

  • fission

    The splitting of a large nucleus into two smaller ones. (Section 21.6)

  • heterocycle

    A cyclic compound containing at least one heteroatom (such as S, N, or O) in the ring.

  • Line-angle formula

    An abbreviated way to draw structural formulas in which vertices and line endings represent carbons

  • mass defect

    The difference between the mass of a nucleus and the total masses of the individual nucleons that it contains. (Section 21.6)

  • miscible

    Two liquids that can be mixed with each other in any proportion.

  • optically active

    A compound that rotates plane-polarized light.

  • phospholipids

    Esterlike derivatives of phosphoric acid.

  • quaternary structure

    The structure that arises when a protein consists of two or more folded polypeptide chains that aggregate to form one protein complex.

  • secondary

    A term used to indicate that exactly two alkyl groups are attached directly to a particular position. For example, a secondary carbocation has two alkyl groups attached directly to the electrophilic carbon atom (C+).

  • simple lipid

    A lipid that does not undergo hydrolysis in aqueous acid or base to produce smaller fragments.

  • thioacetal

    A compound that contains two SR groups, both of which are connected to the same carbon atom.

  • Triol

    A compound containing three hydroxyl groups.