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Solutions for Chapter 11: Liquids and Intermolecular Forces

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition | ISBN: 9780134414232 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus

Full solutions for Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition

ISBN: 9780134414232

Chemistry: The Central Science | 14th Edition | ISBN: 9780134414232 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus

Solutions for Chapter 11: Liquids and Intermolecular Forces

Solutions for Chapter 11
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Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 14
Author: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward; Matthew E. Stoltzfus
ISBN: 9780134414232

Summary of Chapter 11: Liquids and Intermolecular Forces

Identify the intermolecular attractive interactions (dispersion, dipole–dipole, hydrogen bonding, ion–dipole) that exist between molecules or ions based on their composition and molecular structure and compare the relative strengths of these intermolecular forces.

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science, edition: 14. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 11: Liquids and Intermolecular Forces includes 116 full step-by-step solutions. Chemistry: The Central Science was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780134414232. Since 116 problems in chapter 11: Liquids and Intermolecular Forces have been answered, more than 28256 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • acyl group

    The term describing a carbonyl group (CRO bond) connected to an alkyl group or aryl group.

  • alloy.

    A solid solution composed of two or more metals, or of a metal or metals with one or more nonmetals. (21.2)

  • anti conformation

    A conformation in which the dihedral angle between two groups is 180°.

  • Arrhenius equation

    An equation that relates the rate constant for a reaction to the frequency factor, A, the activation energy, Ea, and the temperature, T: k = Ae-Ea>RT. In its logarithmic form it is written ln k = -Ea>RT + ln A. (Section 14.5)

  • atomic orbital.

    The wave function (?) of an electron in an atom. (7.5)

  • band theory.

    Delocalized electrons move freely through “bands” formed by overlapping molecular orbitals. (21.3)

  • beta (b) rays.

    Electrons. (2.2)

  • buffer capacity

    The amount of acid or base a buffer can neutralize before the pH begins to change appreciably. (Section 17.2)

  • catalytic hydrogenation

    A reaction that involves the addition of molecular hydrogen (H2) across a double bond in the presence of a metal catalyst.

  • Chiral

    From the Greek, cheir meaning hand; an object that is not superposable on its mirror image; an object that has handedness.

  • continuous-wave (CW) spectrometer

    An NMR spectrometer that holds the magnetic field constant and slowly sweeps through a range of rf frequencies, monitoring which frequencies are absorbed.

  • degenerate

    Having the same energy.

  • diastereomers

    Stereoisomers that are not mirror images of one another.

  • ether

    A compound with the structure R!O!R.

  • Gibbs free energy

    A thermodynamic state function that combines enthalpy and entropy, in the form G = H - TS. For a change occurring at constant temperature and pressure, the change in free energy is ?G = ?H - T?S. (Section 19.5)

  • kinetics

    A term that refers to the rate of a reaction.

  • nanomaterial

    A solid whose dimensions range from 1 to 100 nm and whose properties differ from those of a bulk material with the same composition. (Section 12.1)

  • oxidizing agent, or oxidant

    The substance that is reduced and thereby causes the oxidation of some other substance in an oxidation–reduction reaction. (Section 20.1)

  • peptide bond

    A bond formed between two amino acids. (Section 24.7)

  • syn addition

    An addition reaction in which two groups are added to the same face of a p bond.