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General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications 10th Edition - Solutions by Chapter

General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications | 10th Edition | ISBN: 9780132064521 | Authors: Ralph Petrucci

Full solutions for General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications | 10th Edition

ISBN: 9780132064521

General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications | 10th Edition | ISBN: 9780132064521 | Authors: Ralph Petrucci

General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications | 10th Edition - Solutions by Chapter

The full step-by-step solution to problem in General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications were answered by Sieva Kozinsky, our top Chemistry solution expert on 12/23/17, 04:52PM. General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications was written by Sieva Kozinsky and is associated to the ISBN: 9780132064521. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters: 28. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications, edition: 10. Since problems from 28 chapters in General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications have been answered, more than 11459 students have viewed full step-by-step answer.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • angstrom

    A common non-SI unit of length, denoted Å, that is used to measure atomic dimensions: 1Å = 10-10 m. (Section 2.3)

  • Aufbau principle.

    As protons are added one by one to the nucleus to build up the elements, electrons similarly are added to the atomic orbitals. (7.9)

  • cell potential

    The potential difference between the cathode and anode in an electrochemical cell; it is measured in volts: 1 V = 1 J>C. Also called electromotive force. (Section 20.4)

  • dextrorotatory, or merely dextro or d

    A term used to label a chiral molecule that rotates the plane of polarization of plane-polarized light to the right (clockwise). (Section 23.4)

  • fishhook arrow

    A curved arrow with only one barb, indicating the motion of just one electron (also see Sect. 11.1).

  • Fluid-mosaic model

    A biological membrane that consists of a phospholipid bilayer with proteins, carbohydrates, and other lipids on the surface and embedded in the bilayer

  • fuel cell

    A voltaic cell that utilizes the oxidation of a conventional fuel, such as H2 or CH4, in the cell reaction. (Section 20.7)

  • hydrohalogenation

    A reaction that involves the addition of H and X (either Br or Cl) across an alkene.

  • instantaneous rate

    The reaction rate at a particular time as opposed to the average rate over an interval of time. (Section 14.2)

  • Levorotatory

    Refers to a substance that rotates the plane of polarized light to the left.

  • Line-angle formula

    An abbreviated way to draw structural formulas in which vertices and line endings represent carbons

  • molar mass

    The mass of one mole of a substance in grams; it is numerically equal to the formula weight in atomic mass units. (Section 3.4)

  • molecular geometry

    The arrangement in space of the atoms of a molecule. (Section 9.2)

  • molecular hydrides

    Compounds formed when hydrogen reacts with nonmetals and metalloids. (Section 22.2)

  • nucleophile

    A compound containing an electron-rich atom that is capable of donating a pair of electrons.

  • orbital

    An allowed energy state of an electron in the quantum mechanical model of the atom; the term orbital is also used to describe the spatial distribution of the electron. An orbital is defined by the values of three quantum numbers: n, l, and ml (Section 6.5)

  • Polarizability

    A measure of the ease of distortion of the distribution of electron density about an atom or group in response to interaction with other molecules or ions. Fluorine which has a high electronegativity and holds its electrons tightly, has a very low polarizability. Iodine, which has a lower electronegativity and holds its electrons less tightly, has a very high polarizability.

  • polarizability

    The ease with which the electron cloud of an atom or a molecule is distorted by an outside influence, thereby inducing a dipole moment. (Section 11.2)

  • progestins

    Female sex hormones.

  • secondary structure

    The threedimensional conformations of localized regions of a protein, including helices and b-pleated sheets.

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