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Solutions for Chapter 3.4: Counting Atoms

Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2006 | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780030391071 | Authors: R. Thomas Myers, Keith B. Oldham, Salvatore Tocci

Full solutions for Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2006 | 1st Edition

ISBN: 9780030391071

Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2006 | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780030391071 | Authors: R. Thomas Myers, Keith B. Oldham, Salvatore Tocci

Solutions for Chapter 3.4: Counting Atoms

Since 13 problems in chapter 3.4: Counting Atoms have been answered, more than 35569 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 3.4: Counting Atoms includes 13 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2006 was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780030391071. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2006, edition: 1.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Brønsted acid.

    A substance capable of donating a proton. (4.3)

  • conjugate acid–base pair

    An acid and a base, such as H2O and OH-, that differ only in the presence or absence of a proton. (Section 16.2)

  • conjugate base

    A substance formed by the loss of a proton from a Brønsted–Lowry acid. (Section 16.2)

  • Constitutional isomers

    Compounds with the same molecular formula but a different connectivity of their atoms

  • E (Section 5.2C)

    From the German, entgegen, opposite. Specifi es that groups of higher priority on the carbons of a double bond are on opposite sides

  • enol

    A compound containing a hydroxyl group (OH) connected directly to a carbon-carbon double bond.

  • formula weight

    The mass of the collection of atoms represented by a chemical formula. For example, the formula weight of NO2 (46.0 amu) is the sum of the masses of one nitrogen atom and two oxygen atoms. (Section 3.3)

  • Hammond’s postulate

    The structure of the transition state for an exothermic step looks more like the reactants of that step than the products. Conversely, the structure of the transition state for an endothermic step looks more like the products of that step than the reactants.

  • Henderson–Hasselbalch equation

    The relationship among the pH, pKa, and the concentrations of acid and conjugate base in an aqueous solution: pH = pKa + log 3base4 3acid4. (Section 17.2)

  • hydrohalogenation

    A reaction that involves the addition of H and X (either Br or Cl) across an alkene.

  • hydrophobic

    A nonpolar group that does not have favorable interactions with water.

  • immiscible liquids

    Liquids that do not dissolve in one another to a significant extent. (Section 13.3)

  • Lactam

    A cyclic amide.

  • lone pair

    A pair of unshared, or nonbonding, electrons.

  • node

    Points in an atom at which the electron density is zero. For example, the node in a 2s orbital is a spherical surface. (Section 6.6)

  • nucleic acids

    Polymers of high molecular weight that carry genetic information and control protein synthesis. (Section 24.10)

  • Organometallic compound

    A compound that contains a carbon-metal bond.

  • Pauli exclusion principle

    No more than two electrons may be present in an orbital. If two electrons are present, their spins must be paired

  • Resonance hybrid

    A molecule, ion, or radical described as a composite of a number of contributing structures

  • single bond

    A covalent bond involving one electron pair. (Section 8.3)

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