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Solutions for Chapter 5.3: Names and Formulas of Ionic Compounds

Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2006 | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780030391071 | Authors: R. Thomas Myers, Keith B. Oldham, Salvatore Tocci

Full solutions for Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2006 | 1st Edition

ISBN: 9780030391071

Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2006 | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780030391071 | Authors: R. Thomas Myers, Keith B. Oldham, Salvatore Tocci

Solutions for Chapter 5.3: Names and Formulas of Ionic Compounds

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2006, edition: 1. Chapter 5.3: Names and Formulas of Ionic Compounds includes 8 full step-by-step solutions. Since 8 problems in chapter 5.3: Names and Formulas of Ionic Compounds have been answered, more than 13671 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2006 was written by Patricia and is associated to the ISBN: 9780030391071.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • 1,2-addition

    A reaction involving the addition of two groups to a conjugated p system in which one group is installed at the C1 position and the other group is installed at the C2 position.

  • Alkyne

    An unsaturated hydrocarbon that contains one or more carbon-carbon triple bonds.

  • aromatic hydrocarbons

    Hydrocarbon compounds that contain a planar, cyclic arrangement of carbon atoms linked by both s and delocalized p bonds. (Section 24.2)

  • beta (b) rays.

    Electrons. (2.2)

  • bidentate ligand

    A ligand in which two linked coordinating atoms are bound to a metal. (Section 23.3)

  • closed system.

    A system that enables the exchange of energy (usually in the form of heat) but not mass with its surroundings. (6.2)

  • concentration cell

    A voltaic cell containing the same electrolyte and the same electrode materials in both the anode and cathode compartments. The emf of the cell is derived from a difference in the concentrations of the same electrolyte solutions in the compartments. (Section 20.6)

  • electron capture

    A mode of radioactive decay in which an inner-shell orbital electron is captured by the nucleus. (Section 21.1)

  • elimination (of radicals)

    In radical reaction mechanisms, a step in which a bond forms between the alpha (a) and beta (b) positions. As a result, a single bond at the b position is cleaved, causing the compound to fragment into two pieces.

  • face-centered lattice

    A crystal lattice in which the lattice points are located at the faces and corners of each unit cell. (Section 12.2)

  • fracking

    The practice in which water laden with sand and other materials is pumped at high pressure into rock formations to release natural gas and other petroleum materials. (Section 18.4)

  • Hund’s rule

    When orbitals of equal energy are available but there are not enough electrons to fi ll all of them completely, one electron is put in each before a second electron is added to any

  • lipid

    Naturally occurring compoundsthat can be extracted from cells usingnonpolar organic solvents.

  • orbital

    An allowed energy state of an electron in the quantum mechanical model of the atom; the term orbital is also used to describe the spatial distribution of the electron. An orbital is defined by the values of three quantum numbers: n, l, and ml (Section 6.5)

  • precipitate

    An insoluble substance that forms in, and separates from, a solution. (Section 4.2)

  • quartet

    In NMR spectroscopy, a signal that is comprised of four peaks.

  • Reactive intermediate

    A high-energy species formed between two successive reaction steps, that lies in an energy minimum between the two transition states

  • second law of thermodynamics

    A statement of our experience that there is a direction to the way events occur in nature. When a process occurs spontaneously in one direction, it is nonspontaneous in the reverse direction. It is possible to state the second law in many different forms, but they all relate back to the same idea about spontaneity. One of the most common statements found in chemical contexts is that in any spontaneous process the entropy of the universe increases. (Section 19.2)

  • valence bond theory

    A theory that treats a bond as the sharing of electrons that are associated with individual atoms, rather than being associated with the entire molecule.

  • Wittig reagent

    A reagent used to perform a Wittig reaction.

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