Solutions for Chapter 16.2: How Can Reaction Rates Be Explained?

Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2006 | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780030391071 | Authors: R. Thomas Myers, Keith B. Oldham, Salvatore Tocci

Full solutions for Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2006 | 1st Edition

ISBN: 9780030391071

Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2006 | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780030391071 | Authors: R. Thomas Myers, Keith B. Oldham, Salvatore Tocci

Solutions for Chapter 16.2: How Can Reaction Rates Be Explained?

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 16.2: How Can Reaction Rates Be Explained? includes 14 full step-by-step solutions. Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2006 was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780030391071. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2006, edition: 1. Since 14 problems in chapter 16.2: How Can Reaction Rates Be Explained? have been answered, more than 20883 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • 1,2-Shift

    A type of rearrangement in which an atom or group of atoms with its bonding electrons moves from one atom to an adjacent electron-defi cient atom.

  • Achiral

    An object that lacks chirality; an object that has no handedness

  • actinide series.

    Elements that have incompletely filled 5f subshells or readily give rise to cations that have incompletely filled 5f subshells. (7.9)

  • alkylthio group

    An SR group.

  • Base peak

    The peak caused by the most abundant ion in a mass spectrum; the most intense peak. It is assigned an arbitrary intensity of 100

  • buffer solution.

    A solution of (a) a weak acid or base and (b) its salt; both components must be present. The solution has the ability to resist changes in pH upon the addition of small amounts of either acid or base. (16.3)

  • carbocation

    An intermediate containing a positively charged carbon atom.

  • Clemmensen reduction

    A reaction in which a carbonyl group is completely reduced and replaced with two hydrogen atoms.

  • collision model

    A model of reaction rates based on the idea that molecules must collide to react; it explains the factors influencing reaction rates in terms of the frequency of collisions, the number of collisions with energies exceeding the activation energy, and the probability that the collisions occur with suitable orientations. (Section 14.5)

  • column chromatography

    A technique by which compounds are separated from each other based on a difference in the way they interact with the medium (the adsorbent) through which they are passed.

  • Disaccharide

    A carbohydrate containing two monosaccharide units joined by a glycosidic bond.

  • Enantioselective reaction

    A reaction that produces one enantiomer in preference to the other.

  • frequency

    The number of times per second that one complete wavelength passes a given point. (Section 6.1)

  • Hammond postulate

    In an exothermic process the transition state is closer in energy to the reactants than to the products, and therefore the structure of the transition state more closely resembles the reactants. In contrast, the transition state in an endothermic process is closer in energy to the products, and therefore the transition state more closely resembles the products.

  • magic numbers

    Numbers of protons and neutrons that result in very stable nuclei. (Section 21.2)

  • Photons

    An alternative way to describe electromagnetic radiation as a stream of particles

  • polar reaction

    A reaction that involves the participation of ions as reactants, intermediates, or products.

  • radical

    A chemical entity with an unpaired electron.

  • random copolymer

    A polymer, comprised of more than one kind of repeating unit, in which there is a random distribution of repeating units.

  • Schiemann reaction

    The conversion of an aryl diazonium salt into fluorobenzene upon treatment with fluoroboric acid (HBF4).

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