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Solutions for Chapter 4: Arrangement ofElectrons inAtoms

Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780547586632 | Authors: Jerry L. Sarquis, Mickey Sarquis

Full solutions for Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 | 1st Edition

ISBN: 9780547586632

Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780547586632 | Authors: Jerry L. Sarquis, Mickey Sarquis

Solutions for Chapter 4: Arrangement ofElectrons inAtoms

Solutions for Chapter 4
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Textbook: Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012
Edition: 1
Author: Jerry L. Sarquis, Mickey Sarquis
ISBN: 9780547586632

Chapter 4: Arrangement ofElectrons inAtoms includes 72 full step-by-step solutions. Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780547586632. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012, edition: 1. Since 72 problems in chapter 4: Arrangement ofElectrons inAtoms have been answered, more than 46005 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • a-Hydrogen

    A hydrogen on a carbon alpha to a carbonyl group.

  • absorbance

    In UV-Vis spectroscopy, the value log (I0/I) where I0 is the intensity of the reference beam and I is the intensity of the sample beam.

  • aldol addition reaction

    A reaction that occurs when an aldehyde or ketone is attacked by an enolate ion. The product of an aldol addition reaction is always a b-hydroxy aldehyde or ketone.

  • Anti conformation

    A conformation about a single bond in which two groups on adjacent carbons lie at a dihedral angle of 180°.

  • Brønsted-Lowry acid

    A compound that can serve as a proton donor.

  • Brønsted-Lowry base

    A proton acceptor

  • Chromatography

    A separation method involving passing a vapor or solution mixture through a column packed with a material with different affi nities for different components of the mixture.

  • Circular DNA

    A type of double-stranded DNA in which the 59 and 39 ends of each strand are joined by phosphodiester groups.

  • crystallite

    A region of a polymer inwhich the chains are linearly extended and closein proximity to one another, resulting in van der Waals forces that hold the chains close together.

  • cycloaddition reactions

    Reactions in which two p systems are joined together in a way that forms a ring. In the process, two p bonds are converted into two s bonds.

  • electromotive force (emf)

    A measure of the driving force, or electrical pressure, for the completion of an electrochemical reaction. Electromotive force is measured in volts: 1 V = 1 J>C. Also called the cell potential. (Section 20.4)

  • hexagonal close packing

    A crystal structure where the atoms are packed together as closely as possible. The close-packed layers adopt a two-layer repeating pattern, which leads to a primitive hexagonal unit cell. (Section 12.3)

  • Hydrophilic

    From the Greek, meaning water-loving.

  • N-Terminal amino acid

    The amino acid at the end of a polypeptide chain having the free !NH2 group

  • periplanar

    A conformation in which a hydrogen atom and a leaving group are approximately coplanar.

  • polarizability

    The ability of an atom or molecule to distribute its electron density unevenly in response to external influences.

  • precision

    The closeness of agreement among several measurements of the same quantity; the reproducibility of a measurement. (Section 1.5)

  • rem

    A measure of the biological damage caused by radiation; rems = rads * RBE. (Section 21.9)

  • resonance structures (resonance forms)

    Individual Lewis structures in cases where two or more Lewis structures are equally good descriptions of a single molecule. The resonance structures in such an instance are “averaged” to give a more accurate description of the real molecule. (Section 8.6)

  • trigonal pyramidal

    A geometry adopted by an atom that has one lone pair and a steric number of 4.

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