Solutions for Chapter 8.2: Types of ChemicalReactions

Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780547586632 | Authors: Jerry L. Sarquis, Mickey Sarquis

Full solutions for Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 | 1st Edition

ISBN: 9780547586632

Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780547586632 | Authors: Jerry L. Sarquis, Mickey Sarquis

Solutions for Chapter 8.2: Types of ChemicalReactions

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012, edition: 1. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 8.2: Types of ChemicalReactions includes 5 full step-by-step solutions. Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780547586632. Since 5 problems in chapter 8.2: Types of ChemicalReactions have been answered, more than 24288 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Acetal

    A molecule containing two !OR or !OAr groups bonded to the same carbon

  • acidic cleavage

    A reaction in which bonds are broken in the presence of an acid. For example, in the presence of a strong acid, an ether is converted into two alkyl halides.

  • alkali metals

    Members of group 1A in the periodic table. (Section 7.7)

  • alkaline earth metals.

    The Group 2A elements (Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, and Ra). (2.4)

  • antiferromagnetism

    A form of magnetism in which unpaired electron spins on adjacent sites point in opposite directions and cancel each other’s effects. (Section 23.1)

  • atomic radius.

    One-half the distance between the two nuclei in two adjacent atoms of the same element in a metal. For elements that exist as diatomic units, the atomic radius is one-half the distance between the nuclei of the two atoms in a particular molecule. (8.3)

  • Aufbau principle

    A rule that determines the order in which orbitals are filled by electrons. Specifically, the lowest energy orbital is filled first.

  • auxochrome

    When applying Woodward-Fieser rules, the groups attached to the chromophore.

  • cation

    A structure that bears a positive charge.

  • Double helix

    A type of secondary structure of DNA molecules in which two anti parallel polynucleotide strands are coiled in a right-handed manner about the same axis

  • Fluid-mosaic model

    A biological membrane that consists of a phospholipid bilayer with proteins, carbohydrates, and other lipids on the surface and embedded in the bilayer

  • Haloform

    A compound of the type CHX3 where X is a halogen.

  • Hammond’s postulate

    The structure of the transition state for an exothermic step looks more like the reactants of that step than the products. Conversely, the structure of the transition state for an endothermic step looks more like the products of that step than the reactants.

  • ion-product constant

    For water, Kw is the product of the aquated hydrogen ion and hydroxide ion concentrations: 3H+43OH-4 = Kw = 1.0 * 10-14 at 25 °C. (Section 16.3)

  • Markovnikov addition

    In additionreactions, the observation that the hydrogen atomis generally placed at the vinylic position alreadybearing the larger number of hydrogen atoms.

  • methylene group

    A CH2 group.

  • mineral

    A solid, inorganic substance occurring in nature, such as calcium carbonate, which occurs as calcite. (Section 23.1)

  • Para (p)

    Refers to groups occupying l,4-positions on a benzene ring

  • Phasing

    The sign of the wave function at particular coordinates in space, either plus or minus. Phasing is often represented by colors, such as red or blue

  • representative (main-group) element

    An element from within the s and p blocks of the periodic table (Figure 6.29). (Section 6.9)

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