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Solutions for Chapter 10.3: Solids

Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780547586632 | Authors: Jerry L. Sarquis, Mickey Sarquis

Full solutions for Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 | 1st Edition

ISBN: 9780547586632

Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780547586632 | Authors: Jerry L. Sarquis, Mickey Sarquis

Solutions for Chapter 10.3: Solids

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012, edition: 1. Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780547586632. Chapter 10.3: Solids includes 6 full step-by-step solutions. Since 6 problems in chapter 10.3: Solids have been answered, more than 55229 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • alkoxymercuration-demercuration

    A two-step process that achieves Markovnikov addition of an alcohol (H and OR) across an alkene. The product of this process is an ether.

  • alpha (a) amino acid

    A compound containing a carboxylic acid group (COOH) as well as an amino group (NH2), both of which are attached to the same carbon atom.

  • cellulose

    A polysaccharide of glucose; it is the major structural element in plant matter. (Section 24.8)

  • chemical changes

    Processes in which one or more substances are converted into other substances; also called chemical reactions. (Section 1.3)

  • collision model

    A model of reaction rates based on the idea that molecules must collide to react; it explains the factors influencing reaction rates in terms of the frequency of collisions, the number of collisions with energies exceeding the activation energy, and the probability that the collisions occur with suitable orientations. (Section 14.5)

  • decarboxylation

    A reaction involving loss of CO2, characteristic of compounds containing a carbonyl group that is beta to a COOH group.

  • enolate

    The resonance-stabilized conjugate base of a ketone, aldehyde, or ester.

  • equilibrium

    For a reaction, a state in which there is no longer an observable change in the concentrations of reactants and products.

  • Exergonic reaction

    A reaction in which the Gibbs free energy of the products is lower than that of the reactants. The position of equilibrium for an exergonic reaction favors products.

  • first order

    A reaction that has a rate equation in which the sum of all exponents is one.

  • free radical

    A substance with one or more unpaired electrons. (Section 21.9)

  • hydrophilic

    A polar group that has favorable interactions with water.

  • hydroxyl group

    An OH group.

  • ionic compound

    A compound composed of cations and anions. (Section 2.7)

  • Isotactic polymer

    A polymer with identical confi gurations (either all R or all S) at all chiral centers along its chain, as, for example, isotactic polypropylene

  • law of constant composition

    A law that states that the elemental composition of a pure compound is always the same, regardless of its source; also called the law of definite proportions. (Section 1.2)

  • Nucleophilicity

    A kinetic property measured by the rate at which a nucleophile causes nucleophilic substitution on a reference compound under a standardized set of experimental conditions.

  • plastic

    A material that can be formed into particular shapes by application of heat and pressure. (Section 12.8)

  • polymer

    A large molecule of high molecular mass, formed by the joining together, or polymerization, of a large number of molecules of low molecular mass. The individual molecules forming the polymer are called monomers. (Sections 12.1 and 12.8)

  • Telechelic polymer

    A polymer in which its growing chains are terminated by formation of new functional groups at both ends of its chains. These new functional groups are introduced by adding reagents, such as CO2 or ethylene oxide, to the growing chains.

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