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Solutions for Chapter 18.4: Solubility Equilibrium

Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780547586632 | Authors: Jerry L. Sarquis, Mickey Sarquis

Full solutions for Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 | 1st Edition

ISBN: 9780547586632

Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 | 1st Edition | ISBN: 9780547586632 | Authors: Jerry L. Sarquis, Mickey Sarquis

Solutions for Chapter 18.4: Solubility Equilibrium

Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012 was written by Patricia and is associated to the ISBN: 9780547586632. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Modern Chemistry: Student Edition 2012, edition: 1. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 18.4: Solubility Equilibrium includes 7 full step-by-step solutions. Since 7 problems in chapter 18.4: Solubility Equilibrium have been answered, more than 13976 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • activated complex (transition state)

    The particular arrangement of atoms found at the top of the potential-energy barrier as a reaction proceeds from reactants to products. (Section 14.5)

  • activated complex.

    The species temporarily formed by the reactant molecules as a result of the collision before they form the product. (13.4)

  • antiferromagnetism

    A form of magnetism in which unpaired electron spins on adjacent sites point in opposite directions and cancel each other’s effects. (Section 23.1)

  • Arene

    A term used to classify benzene and its derivatives.

  • chelating agent

    A polydentate ligand that is capable of occupying two or more sites in the coordination sphere. (Section 23.3)

  • chemical formula

    A notation that uses chemical symbols with numerical subscripts to convey the relative proportions of atoms of the different elements in a substance. (Section 2.6)

  • critical temperature

    The highest temperature at which it is possible to convert the gaseous form of a substance to a liquid. The critical temperature increases with an increase in the magnitude of intermolecular forces. (Section 11.4)

  • Elastomer

    A material that, when stretched or otherwise distorted, returns to its original shape when the distorting force is released.

  • Hammond postulate

    In an exothermic process the transition state is closer in energy to the reactants than to the products, and therefore the structure of the transition state more closely resembles the reactants. In contrast, the transition state in an endothermic process is closer in energy to the products, and therefore the transition state more closely resembles the products.

  • Hydride ion

    A hydrogen atom with two electrons in its valence shell; H:!

  • Imide

    A functional group in which two acyl groups, RCO! or ArCO!, are bonded to a nitrogen atom

  • Levorotatory

    Refers to a substance that rotates the plane of polarized light to the left.

  • Line-angle formula

    An abbreviated way to draw structural formulas in which vertices and line endings represent carbons

  • Lipid bilayer

    A back-to-back arrangement of phospholipid monolayers, often forming a closed vesicle or membrane.

  • N-bromosuccinimide

    A reagent used for allylic bromination to avoid a competing reaction in which bromine adds across the p bond.

  • Optical purity

    The specifi c rotation of a mixture of enantiomers divided by the specifi c rotation of the enantiomerically pure substance (expressed as a percent). Optical purity is numerically equal to enantiomeric excess, but experimentally determined.

  • Photons

    An alternative way to describe electromagnetic radiation as a stream of particles

  • Polarimeter

    An instrument for measuring the ability of a compound to rotate the plane of plane-polarized light.

  • ribonucleic acid (RNA)

    A polynucleotide in which ribose is the sugar component. (Section 24.10)

  • Telechelic polymer

    A polymer in which its growing chains are terminated by formation of new functional groups at both ends of its chains. These new functional groups are introduced by adding reagents, such as CO2 or ethylene oxide, to the growing chains.

Textbook Survival Guides

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