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Solutions for Chapter 2.7a: PROCESS DATA REPRESENTATION AND ANALYSIS

Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780470616291 | Authors: Richard M. Felder Ronald W. Rousseau, Lisa G. Bullard

Full solutions for Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes | 4th Edition

ISBN: 9780470616291

Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780470616291 | Authors: Richard M. Felder Ronald W. Rousseau, Lisa G. Bullard

Solutions for Chapter 2.7a: PROCESS DATA REPRESENTATION AND ANALYSIS

Solutions for Chapter 2.7a
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This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes, edition: 4. Since 2 problems in chapter 2.7a: PROCESS DATA REPRESENTATION AND ANALYSIS have been answered, more than 8790 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes was written by Patricia and is associated to the ISBN: 9780470616291. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 2.7a: PROCESS DATA REPRESENTATION AND ANALYSIS includes 2 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • adsorption

    The binding of molecules to a surface. (Section 14.7)

  • alkyl group

    A substituent lacking p bonds and comprised of only carbon and hydrogen atoms.

  • Atactic polymer

    A polymer with completely random confi gurations at the chiral centers along its chain, as, for example, atactic polypropylene

  • base peak

    In mass spectrometry, the tallest peak in the spectrum, which is assigned a relative value of 100%.

  • base-dissociation constant (Kb)

    An equilibrium constant that expresses the extent to which a base reacts with solvent water, accepting a proton and forming OH-1aq2. (Section 16.7)

  • beta particles

    Energetic electrons emitted from the nucleus, symbol 0-1e or b-. (Section 21.1)

  • covalent-network solids

    Solids in which the units that make up the three-dimensional network are joined by covalent bonds. (Section 12.1)

  • crystal-field theory

    A theory that accounts for the colors and the magnetic and other properties of transition-metal complexes in terms of the splitting of the energies of metal ion d orbitals by the electrostatic interaction with the ligands. (Section 23.6)

  • Dielectric constant

    A measure of a solvent’s ability to insulate opposite charges from one another

  • Fischer esterifi cation

    The process of forming an ester by refl uxing a carboxylic acid and an alcohol in the presence of an acid catalyst, commonly H2SO4, ArSO3H, or HCl

  • halogen abstraction

    In radical reactions, a type of arrow-pushing pattern in which a halogen atom is abstracted by a radical, generating a new radical.

  • heat of combustion

    The heat given off during a reaction in which an alkane reacts with oxygen to produce CO2 and water.

  • law of definite proportions

    A law that states that the elemental composition of a pure substance is always the same, regardless of its source; also called the law of constant composition. (Section 1.2)

  • Low-resolution mass spectrometry

    Instrumentation that is capable of separating only ions that differ in mass by 1 or more amu.

  • optically inactive

    A compound that does not rotate plane-polarized light.

  • Oxidative addition

    Addition of a reagent to a metal center causing it to add two substituents and to increase its oxidation state by two

  • phenyl group

    A C6H5 group.

  • porphyrin

    A complex derived from the porphine molecule. (Section 23.3)

  • Raoult’s law

    A law stating that the partial pressure of a solvent over a solution, Psolution, is given by the vapor pressure of the pure solvent, P° solvent, times the mole fraction of a solvent in the solution, Xsolvent: Psolution = XsolventP° solvent. (Section 13.5)

  • S (Section 3.3

    From the Latin, sinister, left; used in the R,S convention to show that the order of priority of groups on a chiral center is counterclockwise

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