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Solutions for Chapter 4.73: SUMMARY

Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780470616291 | Authors: Richard M. Felder Ronald W. Rousseau, Lisa G. Bullard

Full solutions for Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes | 4th Edition

ISBN: 9780470616291

Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780470616291 | Authors: Richard M. Felder Ronald W. Rousseau, Lisa G. Bullard

Solutions for Chapter 4.73: SUMMARY

Solutions for Chapter 4.73
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This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780470616291. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes, edition: 4. Since 1 problems in chapter 4.73: SUMMARY have been answered, more than 42116 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 4.73: SUMMARY includes 1 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • allotropes.

    Two or more forms of the same element that differ significantly in chemical and physical properties. (2.6)

  • Amorphous domain

    A disordered, noncrystalline region in the solid state of a polymer.

  • Anabolic steroid

    A steroid hormone, such as testosterone, that promotes tissue and muscle growth and development

  • boat conformation

    A conformation of cyclohexane in which all bond angles are fairly close to 109.5° and many hydrogen atoms are eclipsing each other.

  • common ion effect.

    The shift in equilibrium caused by the addition of a compound having an ion in common with the dissolved substances. (16.2)

  • condensed structure

    A drawing style in which none of the bonds are drawn. Groups of atoms are clustered together when possible. For example, isopropanol has two CH3 groups, both of which are connected to the central carbon atom, shown like this: (CH3)2CHOH.

  • copolymer

    A complex polymer resulting from the polymerization of two or more chemically different monomers. (Section 12.8)

  • Dextrorotatory

    Refers to a substance that rotates the plane of polarized light to the right

  • electromotive force (emf)

    A measure of the driving force, or electrical pressure, for the completion of an electrochemical reaction. Electromotive force is measured in volts: 1 V = 1 J>C. Also called the cell potential. (Section 20.4)

  • Enantioselective reaction

    A reaction that produces one enantiomer in preference to the other.

  • glucose

    A polyhydroxy aldehyde whose formula is CH2OH1CHOH24CHO; it is the most important of the monosaccharides. (Section 24.8)

  • Hückel’s rule

    The requirement for an odd number of p electron pairs in order for a compound to be aromatic.

  • peptide bond

    A bond formed between two amino acids. (Section 24.7)

  • prostaglandins

    Lipids that contain 20 carbon atoms and are characterized by a five-membered ring with two side chains.

  • Protic solvent

    A solvent that is a hydrogen-bond donor. Common protic solvents are water, low-molecular-weight alcohols, and low-molecular weight carboxylic acids.

  • redox (oxidation–reduction) reaction

    A reaction in which certain atoms undergo changes in oxidation states. The substance increasing in oxidation state is oxidized; the substance decreasing in oxidation state is reduced. (Section 4.4; Chapter 20: Introduction)

  • saponification

    The base-catalyzed hydrolysis of an ester. This method is used to make soap.

  • spectroscopy

    The study of the interaction between matter and electromagnetic radiation.

  • Transition state

    The highest energy point on a reaction coordinate diagram. The chemical structure at this point is commonly called an activated complex.

  • Vinylic carbocation

    A double-helix model for the secondary structure of a DNA molecule

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