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Solutions for Chapter 4.82: SUMMARY

Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780470616291 | Authors: Richard M. Felder Ronald W. Rousseau, Lisa G. Bullard

Full solutions for Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes | 4th Edition

ISBN: 9780470616291

Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780470616291 | Authors: Richard M. Felder Ronald W. Rousseau, Lisa G. Bullard

Solutions for Chapter 4.82: SUMMARY

Solutions for Chapter 4.82
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Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780470616291. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 4.82: SUMMARY includes 1 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes, edition: 4. Since 1 problems in chapter 4.82: SUMMARY have been answered, more than 41451 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Acetal

    A molecule containing two !OR or !OAr groups bonded to the same carbon

  • alpha particles

    Particles that are identical to helium-4 nuclei, consisting of two protons and two neutrons, symbol 4 2He or 4 2a. (Section 21.1)

  • Anomeric carbon

    The hemiacetal or acetal carbon of the cyclic form of a carbohydrate

  • base-dissociation constant (Kb)

    An equilibrium constant that expresses the extent to which a base reacts with solvent water, accepting a proton and forming OH-1aq2. (Section 16.7)

  • bond order

    The number of bonding electron pairs shared between two atoms, minus the number of antibonding electron pairs: bond order = (number of bonding electrons - number of antibonding electrons)/2. (Section 9.7)

  • Bonding electrons

    Valence electrons involved in forming a covalent bond (i.e., shared electrons).

  • broadband decoupling

    In 13C NMR spectroscopy, a technique in which all 13C!1H splitting is suppressed with the use of two rf transmitters.

  • chain-growth polymer

    A polymer that is formed under conditions in which the monomers do not react directly with each other, but rather, each monomer is added to the growing chain, one at a time.

  • electron-domain geometry

    The three- dimensional arrangement of the electron domains around an atom according to the VSEPR model. (Section 9.2)

  • equilibrium

    For a reaction, a state in which there is no longer an observable change in the concentrations of reactants and products.

  • Graham’s law

    A law stating that the rate of effusion of a gas is inversely proportional to the square root of its molecular weight. (Section 10.8)

  • Haloalkane (alkyl halide)

    A compound containing a halogen atom covalently bonded to an sp3 -hybridized carbon atom. Given the symbol R!X.

  • HOMO

    The highest occupied molecular orbital.

  • hydrogen bonding

    Bonding that results from intermolecular attractions between molecules containing hydrogen bonded to an electronegative element. The most important examples involve OH, NH, and HF. (Section 11.2)

  • IUPAC

    The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry

  • ozone

    The name given to O3, an allotrope of oxygen. (Section 7.8)

  • Protecting group

    Reversibly creating an unreactive group for the purpose of preventing a functional group from potentially reacting to give an unwanted product or products

  • pyrometallurgy

    A process in which heat converts a mineral in an ore from one chemical form to another and eventually to the free metal. (Section 23.2)

  • Secondary structure of proteins

    The ordered arrangements (conformations) of amino acids in localized regions of a polypeptide or protein

  • steroids

    Lipids that are based on a tetracyclic ring system involving three six-membered rings and one five-membered ring. Cholesterol is an example.

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