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Solutions for Chapter 4.107: SUMMARY

Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780470616291 | Authors: Richard M. Felder Ronald W. Rousseau, Lisa G. Bullard

Full solutions for Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes | 4th Edition

ISBN: 9780470616291

Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780470616291 | Authors: Richard M. Felder Ronald W. Rousseau, Lisa G. Bullard

Solutions for Chapter 4.107: SUMMARY

Solutions for Chapter 4.107
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Chapter 4.107: SUMMARY includes 1 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes, edition: 4. Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780470616291. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 1 problems in chapter 4.107: SUMMARY have been answered, more than 24865 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • addition reaction

    A reaction in which a reagent adds to the two carbon atoms of a carbon–carbon multiple bond. (Section 24.3)

  • Allylic substitution

    Any reaction in which an atom or group of atoms is substituted for another atom or group of atoms at an allylic carbon.

  • basic anhydride (basic oxide)

    An oxide that forms a base when added to water; soluble metal oxides are basic anhydrides. (Section 22.5)

  • Chain propagation

    A step in a chain reaction characterized by the reaction of a reactive intermediate and a molecule to give a new reactive intermediate and a new molecule.

  • compound.

    A substance composed of atoms of two or more elements chemically united in fixed proportions. (1.4)

  • constitutional isomers

    Compounds that have the same molecular formula but differ in the way the atoms are connected.

  • continuous spectrum

    A spectrum that contains radiation distributed over all wavelengths. (Section 6.3)

  • dihydroxylation

    A reaction characterized by the addition of two hydroxyl groups (OH) across an alkene.

  • dilution

    The process of preparing a less concentrated solution from a more concentrated one by adding solvent. (Section 4.5)

  • electron

    A negatively charged subatomic particle found outside the atomic nucleus; it is a part of all atoms. An electron has a mass 1>1836 times that of a proton. (Section 2.3)

  • ether

    A compound in which two hydrocarbon groups are bonded to one oxygen. (Section 24.4)

  • Fatty acid

    A long, unbranched-chain carboxylic acid, most commonly of 12 to 20 carbons, derived from the hydrolysis of animal fats, vegetable oils, or the phospholipids of biological membranes.

  • fibers

    Strands of a polymer that are generated when the polymer is heated, forced through small holes, and then cooled.

  • mixture

    A combination of two or more substances in which each substance retains its own chemical identity. (Section 1.2)

  • Mutarotation

    The change in specifi c rotation that occurs when an a or b hemiacetal form of a carbohydrate in aqueous solution is converted to an equilibrium mixture of the two forms.

  • nuclear binding energy

    The energy required to decompose an atomic nucleus into its component protons and neutrons. (Section 21.6)

  • plasticizers

    Small molecules that are trapped between polymer chains where they function as lubricants, preventing the polymer from being brittle.

  • polarizability

    The ease with which the electron cloud of an atom or a molecule is distorted by an outside influence, thereby inducing a dipole moment. (Section 11.2)

  • Radical

    Any chemical species that contains one or more unpaired electrons.

  • Resolution

    Separation of a racemic mixture into its enantiomers; in mass spectrometry, a measure of how well a mass spectrometer separates ions of different mass.

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