Solutions for Chapter 10.2b: MATERIAL BALANCES

Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780470616291 | Authors: Richard M. Felder Ronald W. Rousseau, Lisa G. Bullard

Full solutions for Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes | 4th Edition

ISBN: 9780470616291

Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780470616291 | Authors: Richard M. Felder Ronald W. Rousseau, Lisa G. Bullard

Solutions for Chapter 10.2b: MATERIAL BALANCES

Solutions for Chapter 10.2b
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This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes, edition: 4. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 1 problems in chapter 10.2b: MATERIAL BALANCES have been answered, more than 21144 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 10.2b: MATERIAL BALANCES includes 1 full step-by-step solutions. Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780470616291.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • aldaric acid

    A dicarboxylic acid that is produced when an aldose or ketose is treated with a strong oxidizing agent, such as HNO3.

  • alkylation

    A reaction that achieves the installation of an alkyl group. For example, an SN2 reaction in which an alkyl group is connected to an attacking nucleophile.

  • bond enthalpy.

    The enthalpy change required to break a bond in a mole of gaseous molecules. (9.10)

  • Carboxyl group (Section 1.3D)

    A !COOH group.

  • Carboxylic ester

    A derivative of a carboxylic acid in which H of the carboxyl group is replaced by a carbon.

  • condensation reaction

    A chemical reaction in which a small molecule (such as a molecule of water) is split out from between two reacting molecules. (Sections 12.6 and 22.8)

  • conjugate acid-base pair.

    An acid and its conjugate base or a base and its conjugate acid. (15.1)

  • d–d transition

    The transition of an electron in a transition-metal compound from a lower-energy d orbital to a higher-energy d orbital. (Section 23.6)

  • enamine

    A compound containing a nitrogen atom directly connected to a carboncarbon p bond.

  • Enantiotopic groups

    Atoms or groups on an atom that give a chiral center when one of the groups is replaced by another group. A pair of enantiomers results. The hydrogens of the CH2 group of ethanol, for example, are enantiotopic. Replacing one of them by deuterium gives (R)-1-deuteroethanol; replacing the other gives (S)-1-deuteroethanol. Enantiotopic groups have identical chemical shifts in achiral environments but different chemical shifts in chiral environments.

  • Fischer projections

    A drawing style that is often used when dealing with compounds bearing multiple chirality centers, especially for carbohydrates. (See also Sect. 5.7.)

  • fracking

    The practice in which water laden with sand and other materials is pumped at high pressure into rock formations to release natural gas and other petroleum materials. (Section 18.4)

  • Grignard reagent

    A carbanion with the structure RMgX.

  • Mass spectrum

    A plot of the relative abundance of ions versus their mass-to-charge ratio

  • molecular geometry

    The arrangement in space of the atoms of a molecule. (Section 9.2)

  • pericylic reactions

    Reactions that occur via a concerted process and do not involve either ionic or radical intermediates.

  • reaction quotient (Q)

    The value that is obtained when concentrations of reactants and products are inserted into the equilibrium expression. If the concentrations are equilibrium concentrations, Q = K; otherwise, Q ? K. (Section 15.6)

  • Reductive amination

    A method for preparing substituted amines by treating an aldehyde or ketone with an amine in the presence of a reducing agent

  • second law of thermodynamics

    A statement of our experience that there is a direction to the way events occur in nature. When a process occurs spontaneously in one direction, it is nonspontaneous in the reverse direction. It is possible to state the second law in many different forms, but they all relate back to the same idea about spontaneity. One of the most common statements found in chemical contexts is that in any spontaneous process the entropy of the universe increases. (Section 19.2)

  • thermosetting resins

    Highly crosslinked polymers that are generally very hard and insoluble.

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