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Solutions for Chapter 11: Theories of Covalent Bonding

Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change - Standalone book | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9780073511177 | Authors: Martin Silberberg Dr., Patricia Amateis Professor

Full solutions for Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change - Standalone book | 7th Edition

ISBN: 9780073511177

Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change - Standalone book | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9780073511177 | Authors: Martin Silberberg Dr., Patricia Amateis Professor

Solutions for Chapter 11: Theories of Covalent Bonding

Solutions for Chapter 11
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Textbook: Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change - Standalone book
Edition: 7
Author: Martin Silberberg Dr., Patricia Amateis Professor
ISBN: 9780073511177

Since 57 problems in chapter 11: Theories of Covalent Bonding have been answered, more than 35229 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 11: Theories of Covalent Bonding includes 57 full step-by-step solutions. Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change - Standalone book was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073511177. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change - Standalone book, edition: 7. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • acid-catalyzed hydration

    A reaction that achieves the addition of water across a double bond in the presence of an acid catalyst.

  • activated complex.

    The species temporarily formed by the reactant molecules as a result of the collision before they form the product. (13.4)

  • axis of symmetry

    An axis about which a compound possesses rotational symmetry.

  • bromonium ion

    A positively charged, bridged intermediate formed during the addition reaction that occurs when an alkene is treated with molecular bromine (Br2).

  • diatomic molecule.

    A molecule that consists of two atoms. (2.5)

  • dissolving metal reduction

    A reaction in which an alkyne is converted into a trans alkene.

  • electron domain

    In the VSEPR model, a region about a central atom in which an electron pair is concentrated. (Section 9.2)

  • energy

    The capacity to do work or to transfer heat. (Section 5.1)

  • Fluid-mosaic model

    A biological membrane that consists of a phospholipid bilayer with proteins, carbohydrates, and other lipids on the surface and embedded in the bilayer

  • fossil fuels

    Coal, oil, and natural gas, which are presently our major sources of energy. (Section 5.8)

  • Friedel-Crafts reaction

    An electrophilic aromatic substitution in which a hydrogen of an aromatic ring is replaced by an alkyl or acyl group.

  • lanthanide (rare earth) element

    Element in which the 4f subshell is only partially occupied. (Sections 6.8 and 6.9)

  • loss of a leaving group

    One of the four arrow-pushing patterns for ionic reactions.

  • Meta (m)

    Refers to groups occupying 1,3-positions on a benzene ring.

  • Molecular spectroscopy

    The study of which frequencies of radiation are absorbed or emitted by a particular substance and the correlation of these frequencies with details of molecular structure.

  • Nucleoside

    A building block of nucleic acids, consisting of d-ribose or 2-deoxy-d-ribose bonded to a heterocyclic aromatic amine base by a b-N-glycosidic bond

  • Oxidative addition

    Addition of a reagent to a metal center causing it to add two substituents and to increase its oxidation state by two

  • Primary (1°) amine

    An amine in which nitrogen is bonded to one carbon and two hydrogens

  • Telechelic polymer

    A polymer in which its growing chains are terminated by formation of new functional groups at both ends of its chains. These new functional groups are introduced by adding reagents, such as CO2 or ethylene oxide, to the growing chains.

  • Wittig reaction

    A reaction that converts an aldehyde or ketone into an alkene, with the introduction of one or more carbon atoms.

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