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Solutions for Chapter 2: Chemistry: The Central Science 12th Edition

Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321696724 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward

Full solutions for Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition

ISBN: 9780321696724

Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321696724 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward

Solutions for Chapter 2

Solutions for Chapter 2
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Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 12
Author: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward
ISBN: 9780321696724

Since 122 problems in chapter 2 have been answered, more than 129799 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chemistry: The Central Science was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321696724. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science, edition: 12. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 2 includes 122 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Brønsted-Lowry acid

    A compound that can serve as a proton donor.

  • cellular respiration

    A process by which molecular oxygen is used to convert food into CO2, water, and energy.

  • dihydroxylation

    A reaction characterized by the addition of two hydroxyl groups (OH) across an alkene.

  • electronic charge

    The negative charge carried by an electron; it has a magnitude of 1.602 * 10-19 C. (Section 2.3)

  • folding

    The process by which a protein adopts its biologically active shape. (Section 24.7)

  • hyperconjugation

    An effect that explains why alkyl groups stabilize a carbocation.

  • hypothesis

    A tentative explanation of a series of observations or of a natural law. (Section 1.3)

  • Hückel’s rule

    The requirement for an odd number of p electron pairs in order for a compound to be aromatic.

  • Imine

    A compound containing a carbon-nitrogen double bond, R2C"NR’; also called a Schiff base

  • law of mass action

    The rules by which the equilibrium constant is expressed in terms of the concentrations of reactants and products, in accordance with the balanced chemical equation for the reaction. (Section 15.2)

  • lecithins

    Phosphoglycerides thatcontain choline.

  • Pericyclic reaction

    A reaction that takes place in a single step, without intermediates, and involves a cyclic redistribution of bonding electrons

  • polycarbonates

    Polymers that are similar in structure to polyesters but with repeating carbonate groups (!O!CO2!) instead of repeating ester groups (!CO2!). polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

  • polynucleotide

    A polymer constructed from nucleotides linked together.

  • reaction quotient (Q)

    The value that is obtained when concentrations of reactants and products are inserted into the equilibrium expression. If the concentrations are equilibrium concentrations, Q = K; otherwise, Q ? K. (Section 15.6)

  • staggered conformation

    A conformation in which nearby groups in a Newman projection have a dihedral angle of 60°.

  • tetrahedral intermediate

    An intermediate with tetrahedral geometry. This type of intermediate is formed when a nucleophile attacks the carbonyl group of a carboxylic acid derivative.

  • torsional strain

    The difference in energy between staggered and eclipsed conformations (for example, in ethane).

  • transport protein

    A protein used to transport molecules or ions from one location to another. Hemoglobin is a classic example of a transport protein, used to transport molecular oxygen from the lungs to all the tissues of the body.

  • vibrational excitation

    In IR spectroscopy, the energy of a photon is absorbed and temporarily stored as vibrational energy

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