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Solutions for Chapter 3: Chemistry: The Central Science 12th Edition

Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321696724 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward

Full solutions for Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition

ISBN: 9780321696724

Chemistry: The Central Science | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9780321696724 | Authors: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward

Solutions for Chapter 3

Solutions for Chapter 3
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Textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science
Edition: 12
Author: Theodore E. Brown; H. Eugene LeMay; Bruce E. Bursten; Catherine Murphy; Patrick Woodward
ISBN: 9780321696724

Chemistry: The Central Science was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321696724. Chapter 3 includes 131 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Chemistry: The Central Science, edition: 12. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 131 problems in chapter 3 have been answered, more than 217942 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • aromatic hydrocarbon.

    A hydrocarbon that contains one or more benzene rings. (24.1)

  • atomic radius.

    One-half the distance between the two nuclei in two adjacent atoms of the same element in a metal. For elements that exist as diatomic units, the atomic radius is one-half the distance between the nuclei of the two atoms in a particular molecule. (8.3)

  • Bredt’s rule

    A rule that states that it is not possible for a bridgehead carbon of a bicyclic system to possess a carbon carbon double bond if it involves a trans p bond being incorporated in a ring comprised of fewer than eight atoms.

  • dehydration

    An elimination reaction involving the loss of H and OH.

  • Double-headed arrow

    A symbol used to show that structures on either side of it are resonance-contributing structures

  • eicosanoids

    A class of lipids which includes leukotrienes, prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and prostacyclins.

  • Energy diagram

    A graph showing the changes in energy that occur during a chemical reaction; energy is plotted on the vertical axis, and reaction progress is plotted on the horizontal axis. Also called a reaction coordinate diagram

  • Glass transition temperature (TG)

    The temperature at which a polymer undergoes the transition from a hard glass to a rubbery state

  • Haworth projection

    For substituted cycloalkanes, a drawing style used to clearly identify which groups are above the ring and which groups are below the ring. (See also Sect. 4.14.)

  • magnetic moment

    A magneticfield generated by a spinning proton.

  • Nucleophilicity

    A kinetic property measured by the rate at which a nucleophile causes nucleophilic substitution on a reference compound under a standardized set of experimental conditions.

  • optically active

    A compound that rotates plane-polarized light.

  • phospholipid

    A form of lipid molecule that contains charged phosphate groups. (Section 24.9)

  • polarizability

    The ease with which the electron cloud of an atom or a molecule is distorted by an outside influence, thereby inducing a dipole moment. (Section 11.2)

  • radical initiator

    A compound with a weak bond that undergoes homolytic bond cleavage with great ease, producing radicals that can initiate a radical chain process.

  • reduction

    A process in which a substance gains one or more electrons. (Section 4.4)

  • second law of thermodynamics

    A statement of our experience that there is a direction to the way events occur in nature. When a process occurs spontaneously in one direction, it is nonspontaneous in the reverse direction. It is possible to state the second law in many different forms, but they all relate back to the same idea about spontaneity. One of the most common statements found in chemical contexts is that in any spontaneous process the entropy of the universe increases. (Section 19.2)

  • Synstereoselective

    The addition of atoms or groups of atoms to the same face of a carbon-carbon double bond.

  • Tertiary (3°) amine

    An amine in which nitrogen is bonded to three carbons

  • tetravalent

    An element, such as carbon, that forms four bonds.

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