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Solutions for Chapter 2: Acids and Bases; Functional Groups

Organic Chemistry | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780321971371 | Authors: Leroy G. Wade, Jan W. Simek

Full solutions for Organic Chemistry | 9th Edition

ISBN: 9780321971371

Organic Chemistry | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780321971371 | Authors: Leroy G. Wade, Jan W. Simek

Solutions for Chapter 2: Acids and Bases; Functional Groups

Solutions for Chapter 2
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Textbook: Organic Chemistry
Edition: 9
Author: Leroy G. Wade, Jan W. Simek
ISBN: 9780321971371

Organic Chemistry was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321971371. Chapter 2: Acids and Bases; Functional Groups includes 65 full step-by-step solutions. Since 65 problems in chapter 2: Acids and Bases; Functional Groups have been answered, more than 52184 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Organic Chemistry, edition: 9. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Addition reaction

    A reaction in which two atoms or groups of atoms react with a double bond, forming a compound with the two new groups bonded to the carbons of the original double bond.

  • amorphous solid.

    A solid that lacks a regular three-dimensional arrangement of atoms or molecules. (11.7)

  • anode

    An electrode at which oxidation occurs. (Section 20.3)

  • Avogadro’s number (NA)

    The number of 12C atoms in exactly 12 g of 12C; it equals 6.022 * 1023 mol-1. (Section 3.4)

  • bond order

    The number of bonding electron pairs shared between two atoms, minus the number of antibonding electron pairs: bond order = (number of bonding electrons - number of antibonding electrons)/2. (Section 9.7)

  • complete ionic equation

    A chemical equation in which dissolved strong electrolytes (such as dissolved ionic compounds) are written as separate ions. (Section 4.2)

  • conductor.

    Substance capable of conducting electric current. (21.3)

  • Cope rearrangement

    A [3,3] sigmatropic rearrangement in which all six atoms of the cyclic transition state are carbon atoms.

  • degenerate

    Having the same energy.

  • doping

    Incorporation of a hetero atom into a solid to change its electrical properties. For example, incorporation of P into Si. (Section 12.7)

  • Enantioselective reaction

    A reaction that produces one enantiomer in preference to the other.

  • Enolate anion

    An anion derived by loss of a hydrogen from a carbon alpha to a carbonyl group; the anion of an enol.

  • Hund’s rule

    When orbitals of equal energy are available but there are not enough electrons to fi ll all of them completely, one electron is put in each before a second electron is added to any

  • Lewis base

    An electron-pair donor. (Section 16.11)

  • liquid

    Matter that has a distinct volume but no specific shape. (Section 1.2)

  • mean free path

    The average distance traveled by a gas molecule between collisions. (Section 10.8)

  • nitrous acid

    A compound with molecular formula HONO.

  • Pauli exclusion principle

    No more than two electrons may be present in an orbital. If two electrons are present, their spins must be paired

  • Polar covalent bond

    A covalent bond between atoms whose difference in electronegativity is between approximately 0.5 and 1.9.

  • Z

    For alkenes, a stereodescriptor that indicates that the two priority groups are on the same side of the p bond.