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Solutions for Chapter 13: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

Organic Chemistry | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780321971371 | Authors: Leroy G. Wade, Jan W. Simek

Full solutions for Organic Chemistry | 9th Edition

ISBN: 9780321971371

Organic Chemistry | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780321971371 | Authors: Leroy G. Wade, Jan W. Simek

Solutions for Chapter 13: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

Solutions for Chapter 13
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Textbook: Organic Chemistry
Edition: 9
Author: Leroy G. Wade, Jan W. Simek
ISBN: 9780321971371

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Organic Chemistry, edition: 9. Since 63 problems in chapter 13: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy have been answered, more than 37986 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 13: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy includes 63 full step-by-step solutions. Organic Chemistry was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321971371.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • absorption spectrum

    A pattern of variation in the amount of light absorbed by a sample as a function of wavelength. (Section 23.5)

  • alpha decay

    A type of radioactive decay in which an atomic nucleus emits an alpha particle and thereby transforms (or “decays”) into an atom with a mass number 4 less and atomic number 2 less. (Section 21.1)

  • antibonding molecular orbital

    A molecular orbital in which electron density is concentrated outside the region between the two nuclei of bonded atoms. Such orbitals, designated as s* or p*, are less stable (of higher energy) than bonding molecular orbitals. (Section 9.7)

  • Avogadro’s law.

    At constant pressure and temperature, the volume of a gas is directly proportional to the number of moles of the gas present. (5.3)

  • cathode

    An electrode at which reduction occurs. (Section 20.3)

  • common ion effect.

    The shift in equilibrium caused by the addition of a compound having an ion in common with the dissolved substances. (16.2)

  • conduction band

    A band of molecular orbitals lying higher in energy than the occupied valence band and distinctly separated from it. (Section 12.7)

  • energy

    The capacity to do work or to transfer heat. (Section 5.1)

  • imidazole

    A compound containing a five-membered ring that is similar to pyrrole but has one extra nitrogen atom at the 3 position.

  • intermediate

    A structure corresponding to a local minimum (valley) in an energy diagram.

  • Lipid bilayer

    A back-to-back arrangement of phospholipid monolayers, often forming a closed vesicle or membrane.

  • molarity

    The concentration of a solution expressed as moles of solute per liter of solution; abbreviated M. (Section 4.5)

  • Raoult’s law

    A law stating that the partial pressure of a solvent over a solution, Psolution, is given by the vapor pressure of the pure solvent, P° solvent, times the mole fraction of a solvent in the solution, Xsolvent: Psolution = XsolventP° solvent. (Section 13.5)

  • reaction quotient (Q)

    The value that is obtained when concentrations of reactants and products are inserted into the equilibrium expression. If the concentrations are equilibrium concentrations, Q = K; otherwise, Q ? K. (Section 15.6)

  • Regioselective reaction

    An addition or substitution reaction in which one of two or more possible products is formed in preference to all others that might be formed.

  • retention time

    The amount of time required for a compound to exit from a gas chromatograph.

  • solid

    Matter that has both a definite shape and a definite volume. (Section 1.2)

  • Specifi c rotation

    The observed rotation of the plane of polarized light when a sample is placed in a tube 1.0 dm in length and at a concentration of 1 g/mL for a solution. For a pure liquid, concentration is expressed in g/mL (density).

  • Tertiary structure of nucleic acids

    The threedimensional arrangement of all atoms of a nucleic acid, commonly referred to as supercoiling

  • unimolecular

    For mechanisms, astep that involves only one chemical entity.

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