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Solutions for Chapter 4: Digital Electronics and Computers

Principles of Instrumental Analysis | 6th Edition | ISBN: 9780495012016 | Authors: Douglas A. Skoog F. James Holler Stanley R. Crouch

Full solutions for Principles of Instrumental Analysis | 6th Edition

ISBN: 9780495012016

Principles of Instrumental Analysis | 6th Edition | ISBN: 9780495012016 | Authors: Douglas A. Skoog F. James Holler Stanley R. Crouch

Solutions for Chapter 4: Digital Electronics and Computers

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Principles of Instrumental Analysis , edition: 6. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 4: Digital Electronics and Computers includes 13 full step-by-step solutions. Since 13 problems in chapter 4: Digital Electronics and Computers have been answered, more than 11996 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Principles of Instrumental Analysis was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780495012016.

Key Chemistry Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • absolute zero

    The lowest attainable temperature; 0 K on the Kelvin scale and -273.15 °C on the Celsius scale. (Section 1.4)

  • aldol condensation

    An aldol addition followed by dehydration to give an a,bunsaturated ketone or aldehyde.

  • alkanamine

    A format for naming primary amines containing a complex alkyl group.

  • base-dissociation constant (Kb)

    An equilibrium constant that expresses the extent to which a base reacts with solvent water, accepting a proton and forming OH-1aq2. (Section 16.7)

  • Condensation polymerization

    A polymerization in which chain growth occurs in a stepwise manner between difunctional monomers. Also called step-growth polymerization.

  • dehydrohalogenation

    An elimination reaction involving the loss of H and a halogen (such as Cl, Br, or I).

  • diastereomers

    Stereoisomers that are not mirror images of one another.

  • electrophile

    A compound containing an electron-deficient atom that is capable of accepting a pair of electrons.

  • Ester

    A derivative of a carboxylic acid in which H of the carboxyl group is replaced by a carbon.

  • Fischer esterifi cation

    The process of forming an ester by refl uxing a carboxylic acid and an alcohol in the presence of an acid catalyst, commonly H2SO4, ArSO3H, or HCl

  • glass

    An amorphous solid formed by fusion of SiO2, CaO, and Na2O. Other oxides may also be used to form glasses with differing characteristics. (Section 22.10)

  • heterolytic bond cleavage

    Bond breaking that results in the formation of ions.

  • molecular orbital (MO)

    An allowed state for an electron in a molecule. According to molecular-orbital theory, a molecular orbital is entirely analogous to an atomic orbital, which is an allowed state for an electron in an atom. Most bonding molecular orbitals can be classified as s or p, depending on the disposition of electron density with respect to the internuclear axis. (Section 9.7)

  • natural gas

    A naturally occurring mixture of gaseous hydrocarbon compounds composed of hydrogen and carbon. (Section 5.8)

  • Nitrogen rule

    A rule stating that the molecular ion of a compound with an odd number of nitrogen atoms has an odd m/z ratio; if zero or an even number of nitrogen atoms, the molecular ion has an even m/z ratio

  • Phenyl group

    A group derived by removing an H from benzene; abbreviated C6H5! or Ph!.

  • specific heat 1Cs2

    The heat capacity of 1 g of a substance; the heat required to raise the temperature of 1 g of a substance by 1 °C. (Section 5.5)

  • specific rotation

    For a chiral compound that is subjected to plane-polarized light, the observed rotation when a standard concentration (1 g/mL) and a standard path length (1 dm) are used.

  • thermodynamics

    The study of how energy is distributed under the influence of entropy. For chemists, the thermodynamics of a reaction specifically refers to the study of the relative energy levels of reactants and products.

  • thermosetting resins

    Highly crosslinked polymers that are generally very hard and insoluble.

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